Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Molecular dialogue between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and the nonhost plant Arabidopsis thaliana switches from initial detection to antagonism


Fernández, Iván; Cosme, Marco; Stringlis, Ioannis A; Yu, Ke; Jonge, Ronnie; van Wees, SaskiaCM; Pozo, Maria J; Pieterse, Corné M J; van der Heijden, Marcel G A (2019). Molecular dialogue between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and the nonhost plant Arabidopsis thaliana switches from initial detection to antagonism. New Phytologist, 223(2):867-881.

Abstract

Approximately 29% of all vascular plant species are unable to establish an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis. Despite this, AM fungi (Rhizophagus spp.) are enriched in the root microbiome of the nonhost Arabidopsis thaliana, and Arabidopsis roots become colonized when AM networks nurtured by host plants are available.
Here, we investigated the nonhost–AM fungus interaction by analyzing transcriptional changes in Rhizophagus, Arabidopsis and the host plant Medicago truncatula while growing in the same mycorrhizal network.
In early interaction stages, Rhizophagus activated the Arabidopsis strigolactone biosynthesis genes CCD7 and CCD8, suggesting that detection of AM fungi is not completely impaired. However, in colonized Arabidopsis roots, fungal nutrient transporter genes GintPT, GintAMT2, GintMST2 and GintMST4, essential for AM symbiosis, were not activated. RNA‐seq transcriptome analysis pointed to activation of costly defenses in colonized Arabidopsis roots. Moreover, Rhizophagus colonization caused a 50% reduction in shoot biomass, but also led to enhanced systemic immunity against Botrytis cinerea.
This suggests that early signaling between AM fungi and Arabidopsis is not completely impaired and that incompatibility appears at later interaction stages. Moreover, Rhizophagus‐mediated defenses coincide with reduced Arabidopsis growth, but also with systemic disease resistance, highlighting the multifunctional role of AM fungi in host and nonhost interactions.

Abstract

Approximately 29% of all vascular plant species are unable to establish an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis. Despite this, AM fungi (Rhizophagus spp.) are enriched in the root microbiome of the nonhost Arabidopsis thaliana, and Arabidopsis roots become colonized when AM networks nurtured by host plants are available.
Here, we investigated the nonhost–AM fungus interaction by analyzing transcriptional changes in Rhizophagus, Arabidopsis and the host plant Medicago truncatula while growing in the same mycorrhizal network.
In early interaction stages, Rhizophagus activated the Arabidopsis strigolactone biosynthesis genes CCD7 and CCD8, suggesting that detection of AM fungi is not completely impaired. However, in colonized Arabidopsis roots, fungal nutrient transporter genes GintPT, GintAMT2, GintMST2 and GintMST4, essential for AM symbiosis, were not activated. RNA‐seq transcriptome analysis pointed to activation of costly defenses in colonized Arabidopsis roots. Moreover, Rhizophagus colonization caused a 50% reduction in shoot biomass, but also led to enhanced systemic immunity against Botrytis cinerea.
This suggests that early signaling between AM fungi and Arabidopsis is not completely impaired and that incompatibility appears at later interaction stages. Moreover, Rhizophagus‐mediated defenses coincide with reduced Arabidopsis growth, but also with systemic disease resistance, highlighting the multifunctional role of AM fungi in host and nonhost interactions.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
4 citations in Web of Science®
5 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 07 Feb 2020
1 download since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Plant and Microbial Biology
07 Faculty of Science > Zurich-Basel Plant Science Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:580 Plants (Botany)
Uncontrolled Keywords:Plant Science, Physiology
Language:English
Date:1 July 2019
Deposited On:07 Feb 2020 11:39
Last Modified:08 Feb 2020 08:37
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0028-646X
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.15798
Project Information:
  • : FunderFP7
  • : Grant ID611281
  • : Project TitleDYMASOS - Dynamic Management of Physically Coupled Systems of Systems
  • : FunderFP7
  • : Grant ID269072
  • : Project TitlePLANTIMMUSYS - The Plant Immune System: a multidisciplinary approach to uncover how plants simultaneously deal with beneficial and parasitic organisms to maximize profits and protection

Download

Closed Access: Download allowed only for UZH members