Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Autonomous goal striving promotes a nonlimited theory about willpower


Sieber, Vanda; Flückiger, Lavinia; Mata, Jutta; Bernecker, Katharina; Job, Veronika (2019). Autonomous goal striving promotes a nonlimited theory about willpower. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 45(8):1295-1307.

Abstract

People who believe that willpower is not limited exhibit higher self-regulation and well-being than people who believe that willpower is a limited resource. So far, only little is known about the antecedents of people’s beliefs about willpower. Three studies examine whether autonomous goal striving promotes the endorsement of a nonlimited belief and whether this relationship is mediated by vitality, the feeling of being awake and energetic. Study 1 ( n = 208) showed that autonomous goal striving predicts a change in willpower beliefs over 4 months and that this change is mediated by vitality. Study 2 ( n = 92) replicated this finding using experience sampling assessments of vitality. Experimental Study 3 ( n = 243) showed that inducing an autonomous mind-set enhances people’s endorsement of a nonlimited belief by fostering vitality. The studies support the idea that what people believe about willpower depends, at least in part, on recent experiences with tasks as being energizing or draining.

Abstract

People who believe that willpower is not limited exhibit higher self-regulation and well-being than people who believe that willpower is a limited resource. So far, only little is known about the antecedents of people’s beliefs about willpower. Three studies examine whether autonomous goal striving promotes the endorsement of a nonlimited belief and whether this relationship is mediated by vitality, the feeling of being awake and energetic. Study 1 ( n = 208) showed that autonomous goal striving predicts a change in willpower beliefs over 4 months and that this change is mediated by vitality. Study 2 ( n = 92) replicated this finding using experience sampling assessments of vitality. Experimental Study 3 ( n = 243) showed that inducing an autonomous mind-set enhances people’s endorsement of a nonlimited belief by fostering vitality. The studies support the idea that what people believe about willpower depends, at least in part, on recent experiences with tasks as being energizing or draining.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
1 citation in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Education
06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:370 Education
Uncontrolled Keywords:Autonomy, vitality, implicit theories, willpower, self-regulation
Language:English
Date:17 January 2019
Deposited On:03 Feb 2020 08:57
Last Modified:03 Feb 2020 08:59
Publisher:Sage Publications
ISSN:0146-1672
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/0146167218820921
Related URLs:https://www.recherche-portal.ch/permalink/f/1h21i27/ebi01_prod000992990 (Library Catalogue)
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID100014_159395
  • : Project TitleEffects of Implicit Theories About Willpower on Self-Regulation, Goal Striving, and Well-Being: A Life-Span Perspective

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library