Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Promoting Treatment Credibility


Constantino, Michael J; Coyne, Alice E; Boswell, James F; Iles, Brittany R; Vîslă, Andreea (2019). Promoting Treatment Credibility. In: Norcross, John C. Psychotherapy Relationships that Work: Volume 1: Evidence-Based Therapist Contributions. New York: Oxford University Press, 495-521.

Abstract

Patients’ perception of treatment credibility represents their belief about a treatment’s personal logicality, suitability, and efficaciousness. Although long considered an important common factor bearing on clinical outcome, there have been no systematic reviews of the credibility–outcome association. In this chapter, the authors first discuss the definitions of credibility and similar constructs, common measures of credibility, clinical examples of treatment credibility perception, and several landmark studies. The chapter then presents a meta-analysis of the association between patients’ credibility perception and their posttreatment outcomes. The meta-analysis was conducted on 24 independent samples with 1,504 patients. The overall weighted effect size was r = .12, or d = .24. Next, the authors present moderators and mediators of the treatment credibility–outcome link (the former in the context of the meta-analysis), evidence supporting causality in the association, patient factors contributing to their treatment credibility perception, and limitations of the research base. Finally, the chapter reviews diversity considerations, training implications, and therapeutic practices with regard to patient-perceived treatment credibility and its association with therapy outcome.

Abstract

Patients’ perception of treatment credibility represents their belief about a treatment’s personal logicality, suitability, and efficaciousness. Although long considered an important common factor bearing on clinical outcome, there have been no systematic reviews of the credibility–outcome association. In this chapter, the authors first discuss the definitions of credibility and similar constructs, common measures of credibility, clinical examples of treatment credibility perception, and several landmark studies. The chapter then presents a meta-analysis of the association between patients’ credibility perception and their posttreatment outcomes. The meta-analysis was conducted on 24 independent samples with 1,504 patients. The overall weighted effect size was r = .12, or d = .24. Next, the authors present moderators and mediators of the treatment credibility–outcome link (the former in the context of the meta-analysis), evidence supporting causality in the association, patient factors contributing to their treatment credibility perception, and limitations of the research base. Finally, the chapter reviews diversity considerations, training implications, and therapeutic practices with regard to patient-perceived treatment credibility and its association with therapy outcome.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, not_refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2019
Deposited On:30 Jan 2020 09:24
Last Modified:30 Jan 2020 09:24
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISBN:9780199737208
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/med-psych/9780190843953.003.0014

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library