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Too exhausted to go to bed: Implicit theories about willpower and stress predict bedtime procrastination


Bernecker, Katharina; Job, Veronika (2020). Too exhausted to go to bed: Implicit theories about willpower and stress predict bedtime procrastination. British Journal of Psychology, 111(1):126-147.

Abstract

While most people are aware of the importance of sleep for their health, well‐being, and performance, bedtime procrastination is a pervasive phenomenon that can be conceptualized as a case of self‐control failure (Kroese et al., Frontiers in Psychology, 5, 2014, 1). Two daily diary studies (N1 = 185, N2 = 137) investigated beliefs about willpower and stress as interactive predictors of bedtime procrastination. Beliefs about willpower capture whether people think of their willpower as limited resource that gets easily depleted (limited theory) or as something that remains regardless of previous acts of self‐control (non‐limited theory). Results show that after a stressful day, people with a limited versus non‐limited theory procrastinate more on going to bed, while there is no difference in bedtime procrastination on less stressful days. Thus, ironically, limited theorists who should be more concerned with recovering their resources after a stressful day sleep less the following night.

Abstract

While most people are aware of the importance of sleep for their health, well‐being, and performance, bedtime procrastination is a pervasive phenomenon that can be conceptualized as a case of self‐control failure (Kroese et al., Frontiers in Psychology, 5, 2014, 1). Two daily diary studies (N1 = 185, N2 = 137) investigated beliefs about willpower and stress as interactive predictors of bedtime procrastination. Beliefs about willpower capture whether people think of their willpower as limited resource that gets easily depleted (limited theory) or as something that remains regardless of previous acts of self‐control (non‐limited theory). Results show that after a stressful day, people with a limited versus non‐limited theory procrastinate more on going to bed, while there is no difference in bedtime procrastination on less stressful days. Thus, ironically, limited theorists who should be more concerned with recovering their resources after a stressful day sleep less the following night.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous), General Psychology
Language:English
Date:1 February 2020
Deposited On:30 Jan 2020 11:16
Last Modified:03 Feb 2020 16:17
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0007-1269
Additional Information:This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Bernecker, Katharina; Job, Veronika (2020). Too exhausted to go to bed: Implicit theories about willpower and stress predict bedtime procrastination. British Journal of Psychology, 111(1):126-147 , which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/bjop.12382. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/bjop.12382

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Language: English
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Embargo till: 2021-01-30