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Hay Fever is Associated with Prevalence, Age of Onset and Persistence of Stuttering


Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta; Rodgers, Stephanie; Müller, Mario; von Känel, Roland; Seifritz, Erich; Castelao, Enrique; Strippoli, Marie-Pierre F; Vandeleur, Caroline; Preisig, Martin; Howell, Peter (2020). Hay Fever is Associated with Prevalence, Age of Onset and Persistence of Stuttering. Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders, 4(1):67-73.

Abstract

Objectives
Atopic diseases and adverse childhood experiences are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders including developmental stuttering. This study examined the associations between these factors and lifetime prevalence, age of onset, and persistence of developmental stuttering.
Methods
Data from 4874 participants (2264 men and 2610 women) from the PsyCoLaus study were used. Prevalence, age of onset, and persistence of stuttering were investigated through univariate, bivariate, and regression analyses.
Results
Regression analyses indicated that hay fever, gender, familial aggregation, and fear of punishment by parents were associated with stuttering onset in childhood with odds ratios (OR) of 2–3. Hay fever was associated with an earlier onset of stuttering (difference of 1.5 years, p = .001). Moreover, early onset of stuttering (OR = 0.8, p = .009) and hay fever (OR = 9.2, p = .002) predicted whether stuttering persisted.
Conclusions
This study suggests that immunological imbalances related to atopic diseases such as hay fever and adverse childhood experiences are also related to stuttering. The importance of this link is emphasized by the fact that hay fever is also associated with age of onset and persistence of stuttering.

Abstract

Objectives
Atopic diseases and adverse childhood experiences are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders including developmental stuttering. This study examined the associations between these factors and lifetime prevalence, age of onset, and persistence of developmental stuttering.
Methods
Data from 4874 participants (2264 men and 2610 women) from the PsyCoLaus study were used. Prevalence, age of onset, and persistence of stuttering were investigated through univariate, bivariate, and regression analyses.
Results
Regression analyses indicated that hay fever, gender, familial aggregation, and fear of punishment by parents were associated with stuttering onset in childhood with odds ratios (OR) of 2–3. Hay fever was associated with an earlier onset of stuttering (difference of 1.5 years, p = .001). Moreover, early onset of stuttering (OR = 0.8, p = .009) and hay fever (OR = 9.2, p = .002) predicted whether stuttering persisted.
Conclusions
This study suggests that immunological imbalances related to atopic diseases such as hay fever and adverse childhood experiences are also related to stuttering. The importance of this link is emphasized by the fact that hay fever is also associated with age of onset and persistence of stuttering.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Klinik für Konsiliarpsychiatrie und Psychosomatik
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 March 2020
Deposited On:07 Feb 2020 16:14
Last Modified:20 Feb 2020 12:05
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:2366-7532
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s41252-019-00143-9
Project Information:
  • : FunderFP7
  • : Grant ID100016
  • : Project TitleCESAR - Cost-Efficient Methods and Processes for Safety Relevant Embedded Systems
  • : FunderFP7
  • : Grant ID100016
  • : Project TitleCESAR - Cost-Efficient Methods and Processes for Safety Relevant Embedded Systems

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