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The other explanation for dyspnea: giant paraesophageal hiatal hernia repair routinely improves pulmonary function


Wirsching, Andrea; Klevebro, Fredrik; Boshier, Piers R; Hubka, Michal; Kuppusamy, Madhan K; Kirtland, Steve H; Low, Donald E (2019). The other explanation for dyspnea: giant paraesophageal hiatal hernia repair routinely improves pulmonary function. Diseases of the Esophagus, 32(9):doz032.

Abstract

Paraesophageal hiatal hernias (PEHs) are most commonly associated with gastrointestinal symptoms; less widely appreciated is their potentially important influence on respiratory function. We hypothesize that surgical repair of PEH will significantly improve not only gastrointestinal symptoms, but also preoperative dyspnea and spirometry scores. A prospective Institutional Review Board-approved database was used to review all patients undergoing PEH repair from 2000 to 2016. Patients with pre- and postoperative pulmonary function tests assessed by spirometry were included. Postoperative changes in spirometry measurements were compared to PEH size as reflected by the percentage of intrathoracic stomach observed on preoperative contrast studies. Patients were stratified according to improvement in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1). Patients with >12% (‘significant’) improvement in FEV1 after surgery were compared to the remaining patient population. In total, 299 patients met the inclusion criteria. Symptomatic improvement in respiratory function was noted in all patients after PEH repair. Age, gender, BMI, presenting symptoms, Charlson comorbidity index as well as preoperative comorbidities did not significantly impact the functional outcome. Spirometry results improved in 80% of the patients, 21% of whom showed an improvement of >20% compared to the preoperative level. ‘Significant’ improvement in respiratory function was seen in 122 of 299 (41%) patients. Patients presenting with moderate and severe preoperative pulmonary obstruction demonstrated ‘significant’ improvement in FEV1 in 48% and 40% of cases, respectively. Large PEHs, characterized by a percentage of intrathoracic stomach >75%, was strongly associated with ‘significant’ improvement in FEV1 (P = 0.001). PEHs can impact subjective and objective respiratory status and surgical repair can result in a significant improvement in dyspnea and pulmonary function score that is independent of preoperative pulmonary disease. Gastric herniation of more than 75% was associated with higher possibility for improvement of pulmonary function tests. Patients with persistent and unexplained dyspnea and coexistent PEH should be assessed by an experienced surgeon for consideration of elective repair.

Abstract

Paraesophageal hiatal hernias (PEHs) are most commonly associated with gastrointestinal symptoms; less widely appreciated is their potentially important influence on respiratory function. We hypothesize that surgical repair of PEH will significantly improve not only gastrointestinal symptoms, but also preoperative dyspnea and spirometry scores. A prospective Institutional Review Board-approved database was used to review all patients undergoing PEH repair from 2000 to 2016. Patients with pre- and postoperative pulmonary function tests assessed by spirometry were included. Postoperative changes in spirometry measurements were compared to PEH size as reflected by the percentage of intrathoracic stomach observed on preoperative contrast studies. Patients were stratified according to improvement in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1). Patients with >12% (‘significant’) improvement in FEV1 after surgery were compared to the remaining patient population. In total, 299 patients met the inclusion criteria. Symptomatic improvement in respiratory function was noted in all patients after PEH repair. Age, gender, BMI, presenting symptoms, Charlson comorbidity index as well as preoperative comorbidities did not significantly impact the functional outcome. Spirometry results improved in 80% of the patients, 21% of whom showed an improvement of >20% compared to the preoperative level. ‘Significant’ improvement in respiratory function was seen in 122 of 299 (41%) patients. Patients presenting with moderate and severe preoperative pulmonary obstruction demonstrated ‘significant’ improvement in FEV1 in 48% and 40% of cases, respectively. Large PEHs, characterized by a percentage of intrathoracic stomach >75%, was strongly associated with ‘significant’ improvement in FEV1 (P = 0.001). PEHs can impact subjective and objective respiratory status and surgical repair can result in a significant improvement in dyspnea and pulmonary function score that is independent of preoperative pulmonary disease. Gastric herniation of more than 75% was associated with higher possibility for improvement of pulmonary function tests. Patients with persistent and unexplained dyspnea and coexistent PEH should be assessed by an experienced surgeon for consideration of elective repair.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Visceral and Transplantation Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Gastroenterology, General Medicine, paraesophageal hernia; pulmonology; surgery; symptoms
Language:English
Date:13 November 2019
Deposited On:11 Feb 2020 16:35
Last Modified:11 Feb 2020 16:35
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1120-8694
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/dote/doz032
PubMed ID:31220858

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