Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

T85. Frontal EEG Asymmetry Evoked by Sad Movies Predicts Relapses After Antidepressant Discontinuation


Tröndel, Marius; Berwian, Isabel; Ziogas, Anastasios; de Miquel, Carlota; Villar, Tania; Stephan, Klaas; Stefanics, Gabor; Walter, Henrik; Huys, Quentin (2019). T85. Frontal EEG Asymmetry Evoked by Sad Movies Predicts Relapses After Antidepressant Discontinuation. Biological Psychiatry, 85(10):161-162.

Abstract

Background
Antidepressant discontinuation is associated with a high risk of relapse. Robust predictors of relapse risk after antidepressant discontinuation could support clinical decision-making and possibly help reduce long-term prescriptions. Here, we examined whether frontal EEG asymmetry in the alpha band evoked by sad movies might index relapse risk after antidepressant discontinuation.
Methods
We recruited 35 healthy control subjects and 47 individuals who had achieved stable remission from Major Depressive Disorder while taking antidepressants, and were now intent on discontinuing them. Participants were tested prior to discontinuation and followed up for 6 months after discontinuation to ascertain relapses. All participants underwent EEG recording while viewing sad and neutral movie clips. We compared frontal asymmetry in alpha band power (8-13 Hz) at electrodes F5/F6 during neutral movies vs sad movies.
Results
Patients with remitted MDD did not differ in sadness-induced frontal asymmetry from healthy controls at electrodes F5/6. However, those who went on to relapse (n=14) after discontinuation did differ significantly from those who remained stable (n=33) over the observation period (p=0.004, Cohen's d'=0.93). Simple thresholding of the F5/6 asymmetry could be used to predict relapse with an accuracy of 83% (AUC 0.71).
Conclusions
EEG signals from a pair of frontal electrodes during the viewing of sad movies prospectively distinguished those who would and would not go on to relapse after antidepressant discontinuation. This simple procedure has potential to be translated for clinical use and warrants further investigation.

Abstract

Background
Antidepressant discontinuation is associated with a high risk of relapse. Robust predictors of relapse risk after antidepressant discontinuation could support clinical decision-making and possibly help reduce long-term prescriptions. Here, we examined whether frontal EEG asymmetry in the alpha band evoked by sad movies might index relapse risk after antidepressant discontinuation.
Methods
We recruited 35 healthy control subjects and 47 individuals who had achieved stable remission from Major Depressive Disorder while taking antidepressants, and were now intent on discontinuing them. Participants were tested prior to discontinuation and followed up for 6 months after discontinuation to ascertain relapses. All participants underwent EEG recording while viewing sad and neutral movie clips. We compared frontal asymmetry in alpha band power (8-13 Hz) at electrodes F5/F6 during neutral movies vs sad movies.
Results
Patients with remitted MDD did not differ in sadness-induced frontal asymmetry from healthy controls at electrodes F5/6. However, those who went on to relapse (n=14) after discontinuation did differ significantly from those who remained stable (n=33) over the observation period (p=0.004, Cohen's d'=0.93). Simple thresholding of the F5/6 asymmetry could be used to predict relapse with an accuracy of 83% (AUC 0.71).
Conclusions
EEG signals from a pair of frontal electrodes during the viewing of sad movies prospectively distinguished those who would and would not go on to relapse after antidepressant discontinuation. This simple procedure has potential to be translated for clinical use and warrants further investigation.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Biological Psychiatry
Language:English
Date:1 May 2019
Deposited On:12 Feb 2020 11:05
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 14:06
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0006-3223
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2019.03.408

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library