Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Quantitative in vitro comparison of the thrombogenicity of commercial dental implants


Milleret, Vincent; Lienemann, Philipp S; Bauer, Sebastian; Ehrbar, Martin (2019). Quantitative in vitro comparison of the thrombogenicity of commercial dental implants. Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, 21 Suppl:8-14.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Dental implants often have surface modifications that alter surface topography and chemistry to improve osseointegration and thereby increase treatment predictability. Surface contact-induced blood coagulation is associated with the onset of osseointegration.

PURPOSE

To quantitatively evaluate the thrombogenicity of two commercially available dental implants that have similar surface roughness but different surface chemistry.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

Two commercially available dental implants with anodized or sandblasted acid-etched surfaces were evaluated for thrombogenic properties. Thrombogenicity was assessed by incubating implants for 1 hour in fresh, partially heparinized blood followed by hemocyte quantification, microscopic evaluation, and quantification of thrombogenic biomarkers.

RESULTS

Fibrin coverage was significantly higher on the anodized surface compared with the sandblasted acid-etched surface (P < 0.0001). Platelet and white blood cell attachment followed a similar pattern. The increased thrombogenicity was confirmed based on a significant increase in the levels of the coagulation cascade biomarkers, thrombin antithrombin complex, and β-thromboglobulin (all P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION

Dental implants with comparable roughness but differing surface chemistry had differing extents of blood contact activation. These data suggest that surface chemistry from anodization augments implant thrombogenicity compared with that from sandblasting and acid-etching, which could have implications for osseointegration.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Dental implants often have surface modifications that alter surface topography and chemistry to improve osseointegration and thereby increase treatment predictability. Surface contact-induced blood coagulation is associated with the onset of osseointegration.

PURPOSE

To quantitatively evaluate the thrombogenicity of two commercially available dental implants that have similar surface roughness but different surface chemistry.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

Two commercially available dental implants with anodized or sandblasted acid-etched surfaces were evaluated for thrombogenic properties. Thrombogenicity was assessed by incubating implants for 1 hour in fresh, partially heparinized blood followed by hemocyte quantification, microscopic evaluation, and quantification of thrombogenic biomarkers.

RESULTS

Fibrin coverage was significantly higher on the anodized surface compared with the sandblasted acid-etched surface (P < 0.0001). Platelet and white blood cell attachment followed a similar pattern. The increased thrombogenicity was confirmed based on a significant increase in the levels of the coagulation cascade biomarkers, thrombin antithrombin complex, and β-thromboglobulin (all P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION

Dental implants with comparable roughness but differing surface chemistry had differing extents of blood contact activation. These data suggest that surface chemistry from anodization augments implant thrombogenicity compared with that from sandblasting and acid-etching, which could have implications for osseointegration.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 11 Feb 2020
1 download since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Obstetrics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Oral Surgery
Health Sciences > General Dentistry
Language:English
Date:March 2019
Deposited On:11 Feb 2020 16:44
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 14:07
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1523-0899
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/cid.12737
PubMed ID:30816636

Download

Closed Access: Download allowed only for UZH members