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3D-Scans und 3D-Drucke in der Musikarchäologie. Möglichkeiten und experimentalarchäologische Praxisbeispiele


Flatscher, Elias; Praxmarer, Michael; Recheis, Wolfgang; Schick, Michael (2019). 3D-Scans und 3D-Drucke in der Musikarchäologie. Möglichkeiten und experimentalarchäologische Praxisbeispiele. In: Schöbel, Gunter. Experimentelle Archäologie in Europa: Jahrbuch 2019. Unteruhldingen: Isensee, 140-152.

Abstract

3D-scans and 3D-printing in music archaeology. Possibilities and experimental archaeological practical examples. Due to new technologies, such as 3D-scanning and 3D-printing, revolutionary approaches have been made possible in the reconstruction of musical instruments found in archaeological sites. According to our tests, the method of 3D-scanning is safe, free of contamination, as well as interferences and does not affect the original material, provided that the original is made of suitable material and does not contain any metal parts. Whereas an ordinary documentation based on drawings and pictures does not always allow deeper understanding of the reconstruction of a fragmented instrument, the method of micro CT-scanning, if necessary digitally completing (based on pre-scanned
samples) and 3D-printing allows the creation of an exact copy of the examined object, which is innumerably reproducible in order to experiment with different possibilities of the reconstruction. The exactness of these approaches has been successfully proven through frequency analysis on both the original and the 3D-printed clone. So the music of broken instruments can be brought back to life with comparatively little effort of time
and money.

Abstract

3D-scans and 3D-printing in music archaeology. Possibilities and experimental archaeological practical examples. Due to new technologies, such as 3D-scanning and 3D-printing, revolutionary approaches have been made possible in the reconstruction of musical instruments found in archaeological sites. According to our tests, the method of 3D-scanning is safe, free of contamination, as well as interferences and does not affect the original material, provided that the original is made of suitable material and does not contain any metal parts. Whereas an ordinary documentation based on drawings and pictures does not always allow deeper understanding of the reconstruction of a fragmented instrument, the method of micro CT-scanning, if necessary digitally completing (based on pre-scanned
samples) and 3D-printing allows the creation of an exact copy of the examined object, which is innumerably reproducible in order to experiment with different possibilities of the reconstruction. The exactness of these approaches has been successfully proven through frequency analysis on both the original and the 3D-printed clone. So the music of broken instruments can be brought back to life with comparatively little effort of time
and money.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, not_refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Art History
Dewey Decimal Classification:700 Arts
Language:English, German
Date:2019
Deposited On:11 Feb 2020 09:22
Last Modified:15 Apr 2021 15:12
Publisher:Isensee
Series Name:Experimentelle Archäologie in Europa
Number:18
ISBN:978-3-944255-15-6
Additional Information:Zusammenfassung auf englisch
OA Status:Green
Related URLs:http://www.exar.org/publications/experimental-archaeology-in-europe/?lang=de (Publisher)

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