Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Assessing the level of radiation experienced by anesthesiologists during transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation and protection by a lead cap


Mayr, N Patrick; Wiesner, Gunther; Kretschmer, Angela; Brönner, Johannes; Hoedlmoser, Herbert; Husser, Oliver; Kasel, Albert M; Lange, Rüdiger; Tassani-Prell, Peter (2019). Assessing the level of radiation experienced by anesthesiologists during transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation and protection by a lead cap. PLoS ONE, 14(1):e0210872.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) has become a standard therapy for patients with aortic valve stenosis. Fluoroscopic imaging is essential for TAVI with the anesthesiologist's workplace close to patient's head side. While the use of lead-caps has been shown to be useful for interventional cardiologists, data are lacking for anesthesiologists.

METHODS

A protective cap with a 0.35 lead-equivalent was worn on 15 working days by one anesthesiologist. Six detectors (three outside, three inside) were analyzed to determine the reduction of radiation. Literature search was conducted between April and October 2018.

RESULTS

In the observational period, 32 TAVI procedures were conducted. A maximum radiation dose of 0.55 mSv was detected by the dosimeters at the outside of the cap. The dosimeters inside the cap, in contrast, displayed a constant radiation dose of 0.08 mSv.

CONCLUSION

The anesthesiologist's head is exposed to significant radiation during TAVI and it can be protected by wearing a lead-cap.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) has become a standard therapy for patients with aortic valve stenosis. Fluoroscopic imaging is essential for TAVI with the anesthesiologist's workplace close to patient's head side. While the use of lead-caps has been shown to be useful for interventional cardiologists, data are lacking for anesthesiologists.

METHODS

A protective cap with a 0.35 lead-equivalent was worn on 15 working days by one anesthesiologist. Six detectors (three outside, three inside) were analyzed to determine the reduction of radiation. Literature search was conducted between April and October 2018.

RESULTS

In the observational period, 32 TAVI procedures were conducted. A maximum radiation dose of 0.55 mSv was detected by the dosimeters at the outside of the cap. The dosimeters inside the cap, in contrast, displayed a constant radiation dose of 0.08 mSv.

CONCLUSION

The anesthesiologist's head is exposed to significant radiation during TAVI and it can be protected by wearing a lead-cap.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

5 downloads since deposited on 07 Feb 2020
5 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
Life Sciences > General Agricultural and Biological Sciences
Health Sciences > Multidisciplinary
Language:English
Date:30 January 2019
Deposited On:07 Feb 2020 16:19
Last Modified:12 Sep 2020 12:48
Publisher:Public Library of Science (PLoS)
ISSN:1932-6203
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0210872
PubMed ID:30699164

Download

Gold Open Access

Download PDF  'Assessing the level of radiation experienced by anesthesiologists during transfemoral Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation and protection by a lead cap'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)