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Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring on admission in survivors of recent stroke entering inpatient rehabilitation


Rejmer, P; Palla, A; Schulz, E G; Neumann, C L; Hund, M; Hermann, M (2019). Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring on admission in survivors of recent stroke entering inpatient rehabilitation. Journal of Human Hypertension:Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

Arterial hypertension (AHT) is a major risk factor for stroke, yet blood pressure (BP) goals thereafter remain uncertain. Although additional prognostic value of 24-hour ambulant BP monitoring (ABPM) is acknowledged, its clinical impacts remain limited. We suspected that routine ABPM could identify characteristic circadian BP patterns in different brain lesion types, the knowledge of which might, in turn, be helpful in improving overall BP management in patients after stroke. In our study, we compared cardiovascular parameters derived from ABPM and traditional blood pressure measurements (TBPM) among 105 stroke survivors who entered our inpatient neuro-rehabilitation program. The mean age of mostly male (64.8%) patients was 71 ± 12 years. Ischemic strokes were predominant (75.2%). Despite normotensive systolic BP means in TBPM (133.5 ± 18.2 mmHg) and ABPM (24 h: 122.8 ± 14.7 mmHg), AHT persisted in up to 67.6% of all patients, with ABPM uncovering nocturnal systolic non- or reversed dipping in 89.5% and 53.3%, respectively. The latter was predominant (85.7%) in the hemorrhagic subgroup which also displayed lower daytime SBP than the ischemic one (ABPM: 117.1 ± 11.8 vs 124.7 ± 14.7 mmHg, p = 0.033). Further differences were present among distinct brain lesion types. Sufficient dippers were younger (58 ± 12 vs 75 ± 11 years, p < 0.001), but adjusting for age yielded no independent correlations. In spite of normotensive daytime BP measurements, ABPM detects latent AHT and insufficient nocturnal BP dipping after the acute phase of stroke. Further studies are needed to elucidate the role of increased nocturnal BP in patients after stroke.

Abstract

Arterial hypertension (AHT) is a major risk factor for stroke, yet blood pressure (BP) goals thereafter remain uncertain. Although additional prognostic value of 24-hour ambulant BP monitoring (ABPM) is acknowledged, its clinical impacts remain limited. We suspected that routine ABPM could identify characteristic circadian BP patterns in different brain lesion types, the knowledge of which might, in turn, be helpful in improving overall BP management in patients after stroke. In our study, we compared cardiovascular parameters derived from ABPM and traditional blood pressure measurements (TBPM) among 105 stroke survivors who entered our inpatient neuro-rehabilitation program. The mean age of mostly male (64.8%) patients was 71 ± 12 years. Ischemic strokes were predominant (75.2%). Despite normotensive systolic BP means in TBPM (133.5 ± 18.2 mmHg) and ABPM (24 h: 122.8 ± 14.7 mmHg), AHT persisted in up to 67.6% of all patients, with ABPM uncovering nocturnal systolic non- or reversed dipping in 89.5% and 53.3%, respectively. The latter was predominant (85.7%) in the hemorrhagic subgroup which also displayed lower daytime SBP than the ischemic one (ABPM: 117.1 ± 11.8 vs 124.7 ± 14.7 mmHg, p = 0.033). Further differences were present among distinct brain lesion types. Sufficient dippers were younger (58 ± 12 vs 75 ± 11 years, p < 0.001), but adjusting for age yielded no independent correlations. In spite of normotensive daytime BP measurements, ABPM detects latent AHT and insufficient nocturnal BP dipping after the acute phase of stroke. Further studies are needed to elucidate the role of increased nocturnal BP in patients after stroke.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:29 August 2019
Deposited On:12 Feb 2020 06:50
Last Modified:12 Feb 2020 06:53
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:0950-9240
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41371-019-0237-4
PubMed ID:31467389

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