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Sensory substitution reveals a manipulation bias


Zai, A T; Cavé-Lopez, S; Rolland, M; Giret, N; Hahnloser, R H R (2019). Sensory substitution reveals a manipulation bias. bioRxiv 816835v1, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.

Abstract

Sensory substitution is a promising therapeutic approach for replacing a missing or diseased sensory organ by translating inaccessible information into another sensory modality. What aspects of substitution are important such that subjects accept an artificial sense and that it benefits their voluntary action repertoire? To obtain an evolutionary perspective on affective valence implied in sensory substitution, we introduce an animal model of deaf songbirds. As a substitute of auditory feedback, we provide binary visual feedback. Deaf birds respond appetitively to song-contingent visual stimuli, they skillfully adapt their songs to increase the rate of visual stimuli, showing that auditory feedback is not required for making targeted changes to a vocal repertoire. We find that visually instructed song learning is basal-ganglia dependent. Because hearing birds respond aversively to the same visual stimuli, sensory substitution reveals a bias for actions that elicit feedback to meet animals’ manipulation drive, which has implications beyond rehabilitation.

Abstract

Sensory substitution is a promising therapeutic approach for replacing a missing or diseased sensory organ by translating inaccessible information into another sensory modality. What aspects of substitution are important such that subjects accept an artificial sense and that it benefits their voluntary action repertoire? To obtain an evolutionary perspective on affective valence implied in sensory substitution, we introduce an animal model of deaf songbirds. As a substitute of auditory feedback, we provide binary visual feedback. Deaf birds respond appetitively to song-contingent visual stimuli, they skillfully adapt their songs to increase the rate of visual stimuli, showing that auditory feedback is not required for making targeted changes to a vocal repertoire. We find that visually instructed song learning is basal-ganglia dependent. Because hearing birds respond aversively to the same visual stimuli, sensory substitution reveals a bias for actions that elicit feedback to meet animals’ manipulation drive, which has implications beyond rehabilitation.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Working Paper
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Neuroinformatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2019
Deposited On:11 Feb 2020 13:41
Last Modified:24 Jan 2024 15:35
Series Name:bioRxiv
ISSN:2164-7844
OA Status:Green
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1101/816835
  • Content: Accepted Version