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Genetic underpinnings of risky behavior relate to altered neuroanatomy


Aydogan, G; Daviet, R; Linnér, R Karlsson; Hare, Todd A; Kable, J W; Kranzler, H R; Wetherill, R R; Ruff, C C; Koellinger, P D; Nave, G (2019). Genetic underpinnings of risky behavior relate to altered neuroanatomy. bioRxiv 862417, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.

Abstract

Previous research points to the heritability of risk-taking behavior. However, evidence on how genetic dispositions are translated into risky behavior is scarce. Here, we report a genetically-informed neuroimaging study of real-world risky behavior in a large European sample (N=12,675). We found negative associations between risky behavior and grey matter volume (GMV) in distinct brain regions, including amygdala, ventral striatum, hypothalamus and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC). Polygenic risk scores for risky behaviors, derived from a genome-wide association study in an independent sample (N=297,025), were inversely associated with GMV in dlPFC, putamen, and hypothalamus. This relation mediated ∼2.2% of the association between genes and behavior. Our results highlight distinct heritable neuroanatomical features as manifestations of the genetic propensity for risk taking.

One Sentence Summary
Risky behavior and its genetic associations are linked to lower grey matter volume in distinct brain regions.

Abstract

Previous research points to the heritability of risk-taking behavior. However, evidence on how genetic dispositions are translated into risky behavior is scarce. Here, we report a genetically-informed neuroimaging study of real-world risky behavior in a large European sample (N=12,675). We found negative associations between risky behavior and grey matter volume (GMV) in distinct brain regions, including amygdala, ventral striatum, hypothalamus and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC). Polygenic risk scores for risky behaviors, derived from a genome-wide association study in an independent sample (N=297,025), were inversely associated with GMV in dlPFC, putamen, and hypothalamus. This relation mediated ∼2.2% of the association between genes and behavior. Our results highlight distinct heritable neuroanatomical features as manifestations of the genetic propensity for risk taking.

One Sentence Summary
Risky behavior and its genetic associations are linked to lower grey matter volume in distinct brain regions.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Working Paper
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Economics
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Language:English
Date:2 December 2019
Deposited On:25 Feb 2020 11:00
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 14:22
Series Name:bioRxiv
Number of Pages:66
ISSN:2164-7844
OA Status:Green
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1101/862417
Official URL:https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/862417v1

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