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Multimodal treatment of patients with mental symptom load: A pre–post comparison


Melchart, Dieter; Fischer, Volker; Dai, Jingzhang; Hager, Stefan; Dersch, Lisa; Bachmeier, Beatrice E (2019). Multimodal treatment of patients with mental symptom load: A pre–post comparison. Journal of clinical medicine, 8(10):1610.

Abstract

The Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Hospital in Bad Kötzting, Germany, is treating chronically ill patients, covering a broad range of indications. The aim of this study was to prove the efficacy of a multimodal intervention combining mainstream medicine with TCM treatments on the severity of psychopathological symptoms. Out of 966 patients with chronic psychosomatic disease treated 2017 at the TCM Hospital, we selected 759 patients according to specific criteria and analyzed the outcomes after multimodal intervention. The patients completed a validated questionnaire (International Statistical Classification of Diseases (ICD) Symptom-Rating-(ISR)) at admission, discharge, and follow-up. The most frequent ICD-10 diagnoses were “diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue” (28.5%), “mental and behavioral disorders” (23.7%), and “diseases of the nervous system” (13.8%). Regarding ISR symptom load, “depressive syndrome” and “anxiety syndrome” were the leading burdens showing remissions of about 40%–60% with moderate (0.588) to strong (1.115) effect sizes (Cohen’s d) after treatment. ISR total scores at discharge and follow-up were remarkably lower after intervention (0.64 and 0.75, respectively) compared to 1.02 at admission with moderate to strong effect sizes (0.512–0.815). These findings indicate a clinically relevant relief from mental symptom load after intervention with lasting clinical effects for at least six months.

Abstract

The Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Hospital in Bad Kötzting, Germany, is treating chronically ill patients, covering a broad range of indications. The aim of this study was to prove the efficacy of a multimodal intervention combining mainstream medicine with TCM treatments on the severity of psychopathological symptoms. Out of 966 patients with chronic psychosomatic disease treated 2017 at the TCM Hospital, we selected 759 patients according to specific criteria and analyzed the outcomes after multimodal intervention. The patients completed a validated questionnaire (International Statistical Classification of Diseases (ICD) Symptom-Rating-(ISR)) at admission, discharge, and follow-up. The most frequent ICD-10 diagnoses were “diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue” (28.5%), “mental and behavioral disorders” (23.7%), and “diseases of the nervous system” (13.8%). Regarding ISR symptom load, “depressive syndrome” and “anxiety syndrome” were the leading burdens showing remissions of about 40%–60% with moderate (0.588) to strong (1.115) effect sizes (Cohen’s d) after treatment. ISR total scores at discharge and follow-up were remarkably lower after intervention (0.64 and 0.75, respectively) compared to 1.02 at admission with moderate to strong effect sizes (0.512–0.815). These findings indicate a clinically relevant relief from mental symptom load after intervention with lasting clinical effects for at least six months.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Complementary Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:3 October 2019
Deposited On:14 Feb 2020 09:44
Last Modified:12 Sep 2020 12:48
Publisher:MDPI Publishing
ISSN:2077-0383
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8101610

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