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Small fish (Leucaspius delineatus) that are often released into garden ponds and amphibian breeding sites prey on eggs and tadpoles of the common frog (Rana temporaria)


Leu, T; Lüscher, B; Zumbach, S; Schmidt, B R (2009). Small fish (Leucaspius delineatus) that are often released into garden ponds and amphibian breeding sites prey on eggs and tadpoles of the common frog (Rana temporaria). Amphibia-Reptilia, 30(2):290-293.

Abstract

Non-native fish often negatively affect amphibian populations. The sunbleak (Leucaspius delineatus), a small cyprinid fish, is often released into ponds that support amphibian populations because it is thought not to consume amphibian larvae; the argument was based on diet analyses. Here, we present results from a laboratory experiment that demonstrates that sunbleak consume amphibian eggs and larvae. Mortality of eggs and small tadpoles was 100%. Thus, sunbleak at least potentially could be harmful to amphibian populations despite their preference for small prey items reported in the literature. Although diet analyses are valuable, the assessment of whether a species is a predator of another should not be based solely on diet analyses. Experimental predation trials are necessary to assess predation risk.

Abstract

Non-native fish often negatively affect amphibian populations. The sunbleak (Leucaspius delineatus), a small cyprinid fish, is often released into ponds that support amphibian populations because it is thought not to consume amphibian larvae; the argument was based on diet analyses. Here, we present results from a laboratory experiment that demonstrates that sunbleak consume amphibian eggs and larvae. Mortality of eggs and small tadpoles was 100%. Thus, sunbleak at least potentially could be harmful to amphibian populations despite their preference for small prey items reported in the literature. Although diet analyses are valuable, the assessment of whether a species is a predator of another should not be based solely on diet analyses. Experimental predation trials are necessary to assess predation risk.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:06 May 2009 11:46
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:13
Publisher:Brill
ISSN:0173-5373
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1163/156853809788201153

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