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Food sharing patterns in three species of callitrichid monkeys (Callithrix jacchus, Leontopithecus chrysomelas, Saguinus midas): Individual and species differences


Guerreiro Martins, Eloísa M; de Andrade Moura, Antonio; Finkenwirth, Christa; Griesser, Michael; Burkart, Judith M (2019). Food sharing patterns in three species of callitrichid monkeys (Callithrix jacchus, Leontopithecus chrysomelas, Saguinus midas): Individual and species differences. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 133(4):474-487.

Abstract

Food sharing (FS) in cooperatively breeding callitrichids is unusual among nonhuman primates because they regularly share significant amounts of preferred food with immatures and engage in proactive FS. However, it is still unclear which classes of individuals (males or females, breeders or helpers) engage most in FS, and whether differences exist among callitrichid species. In the first part of this study, we characterized general FS patterns in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). We found substantial adult-immature FS, and female breeders shared the least with immatures. This conflicts with previously published studies, where data were collected with the prevailing standard method of providing a food bowl to the entire group. In the second part, a comparison of our access-bias-free method and the standard method suggested that previous findings are likely the result of access bias. In the third part, we investigated species differences in adult-adult FS among common marmosets, golden-headed lion tamarins (Leontopithecus chrysomelas), and red-handed tamarins (Saguinus midas). As common marmosets show lower levels of interdependence within groups, we expected more adult-adult FS in tamarins compared with marmosets. Adult-adult FS was indeed more prevalent in tamarins and not exclusively directed from male breeders to female breeders. Therefore, our results suggest that adult-adult FS in marmosets mostly reflects the high energetic demands of female breeders, whereas in the more interdependent tamarins, it may be used to reinforce cooperative bonds between adult group members. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).

Abstract

Food sharing (FS) in cooperatively breeding callitrichids is unusual among nonhuman primates because they regularly share significant amounts of preferred food with immatures and engage in proactive FS. However, it is still unclear which classes of individuals (males or females, breeders or helpers) engage most in FS, and whether differences exist among callitrichid species. In the first part of this study, we characterized general FS patterns in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). We found substantial adult-immature FS, and female breeders shared the least with immatures. This conflicts with previously published studies, where data were collected with the prevailing standard method of providing a food bowl to the entire group. In the second part, a comparison of our access-bias-free method and the standard method suggested that previous findings are likely the result of access bias. In the third part, we investigated species differences in adult-adult FS among common marmosets, golden-headed lion tamarins (Leontopithecus chrysomelas), and red-handed tamarins (Saguinus midas). As common marmosets show lower levels of interdependence within groups, we expected more adult-adult FS in tamarins compared with marmosets. Adult-adult FS was indeed more prevalent in tamarins and not exclusively directed from male breeders to female breeders. Therefore, our results suggest that adult-adult FS in marmosets mostly reflects the high energetic demands of female breeders, whereas in the more interdependent tamarins, it may be used to reinforce cooperative bonds between adult group members. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Anthropology
Dewey Decimal Classification:300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Social Sciences & Humanities > Psychology (miscellaneous)
Language:English
Date:1 November 2019
Deposited On:27 Apr 2020 15:43
Last Modified:20 May 2020 20:49
Publisher:American Psychological Association
ISSN:0021-9940
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1037/com0000169
PubMed ID:30985161

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