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Two-year outcome comparison of decompression in 14 lipomatosis cases with 169 degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis cases: a Swiss prospective multicenter cohort study


Ulrich, Nils H; Gravestock, Isaac; Winklhofer, Sebastian; Peyneshki, Iliya; Wertli, Maria M; Pichierri, Giuseppe; Fekete, Tamás F; Porchet, François; Farshad, Mazda; Steurer, Johann; Burgstaller, Jakob M; LSOS Study Group (2020). Two-year outcome comparison of decompression in 14 lipomatosis cases with 169 degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis cases: a Swiss prospective multicenter cohort study. European Spine Journal, 29(9):2243-2253.

Abstract

PURPOSE
Spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL) is defined as an abnormal and extensive accumulation of unencapsulated adipose tissue within the spinal epidural space. To date, there is a lack of high-level evidence studies reporting the outcome of surgical treatment of symptomatic SEL in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). The aim was to compare clinical outcomes in patients with symptomatic LSS with and without SEL who underwent decompression surgery alone at the 12- and 24-month follow-up.
METHODS
One hundred and eighty-three patients met the inclusion criteria, of which 14 had mainly SEL on at least one level operated in addition to possible degenerative changes on other levels and 169 degenerative LSS only. The main outcomes were pain (Spinal Stenosis Measure (SSM) symptoms), disability (SSM function), and quality of life [EQ-5D-3L summary index (SI)] at 24-month follow-up, and minimal clinically important difference (MCID) in SSM symptoms, SSM function, and EQ-5D-3L SI.
RESULTS
The multiple regression linear models showed that SEL was associated with worse SSM symptoms (p = 0.045) and EQ-5D-3L SI scores (p = 0.026) at 24-month follow-up, but not with worse SSM function scores. Further, depression (in all models) was negatively associated with better clinical outcomes at 24-month follow-up. In the outcomes SSM symptoms and EQ-5D-3L SI, distinctly more patients in the classical LSS group reached MCID than in the SEL group (71.3% and 62.3% vs. 50.0% and 42.9%).
CONCLUSIONS
Our study demonstrated that decompression alone surgery was associated with significant improvement in disability in both groups at 2 years, but not in pain and quality of life in patients with SEL.

Abstract

PURPOSE
Spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL) is defined as an abnormal and extensive accumulation of unencapsulated adipose tissue within the spinal epidural space. To date, there is a lack of high-level evidence studies reporting the outcome of surgical treatment of symptomatic SEL in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). The aim was to compare clinical outcomes in patients with symptomatic LSS with and without SEL who underwent decompression surgery alone at the 12- and 24-month follow-up.
METHODS
One hundred and eighty-three patients met the inclusion criteria, of which 14 had mainly SEL on at least one level operated in addition to possible degenerative changes on other levels and 169 degenerative LSS only. The main outcomes were pain (Spinal Stenosis Measure (SSM) symptoms), disability (SSM function), and quality of life [EQ-5D-3L summary index (SI)] at 24-month follow-up, and minimal clinically important difference (MCID) in SSM symptoms, SSM function, and EQ-5D-3L SI.
RESULTS
The multiple regression linear models showed that SEL was associated with worse SSM symptoms (p = 0.045) and EQ-5D-3L SI scores (p = 0.026) at 24-month follow-up, but not with worse SSM function scores. Further, depression (in all models) was negatively associated with better clinical outcomes at 24-month follow-up. In the outcomes SSM symptoms and EQ-5D-3L SI, distinctly more patients in the classical LSS group reached MCID than in the SEL group (71.3% and 62.3% vs. 50.0% and 42.9%).
CONCLUSIONS
Our study demonstrated that decompression alone surgery was associated with significant improvement in disability in both groups at 2 years, but not in pain and quality of life in patients with SEL.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neuroradiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of General Practice
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Surgery
Health Sciences > Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
Language:English
Date:1 September 2020
Deposited On:02 Jun 2020 15:52
Last Modified:12 Sep 2020 01:05
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0940-6719
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00586-020-06449-w
PubMed ID:32409888

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