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Occlusion Training During Specific Futsal Training Improves Aspects of Physiological and Physical Performance


Amani-Shalamzari, Sadegh; Sarikhani, Ali; Paton, Carl; Rajabi, Hamid; Bayati, Mahdi; Nikolaidis, Pantelis Theodoros; Knechtle, Beat (2020). Occlusion Training During Specific Futsal Training Improves Aspects of Physiological and Physical Performance. Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 19(2):374-382.

Abstract

This study aimed to examine the effects of lower limb blood flow restriction (BFR) performed during 3-a-side futsal game training on aerobic and anaerobic performance of futsal players. Twelve male futsal players were randomized into two groups (n = 6); both groups performed ten sessions of the 3-a-side game every other day in half of a futsal court; but one group trained under BFR conditions. Pneumatic cuffs used for the BFR group were inflated to 110% leg systolic blood pressure and increased by 10% after each two completed sessions. Before and after the training sessions subjects completed a series of tests to assess aerobic and anaerobic performances along with changes in blood lactate and anabolic and catabolic hormones. All aerobic and anaerobic performance variables improved in both group after training, however improvements in mean power (12.2%, p = 0.03), run time to fatigue (TTF), (7.1%, p = 0.02) and running economy (RE), (-22.7%, p = 0.01) were significantly greater in the BFR group. There were also significant increases in growth hormone (p = 0.01), testosterone to cortisol ratio at first session (p = 0.01) and rate of lactate removal (p = 0.01) at last session in the BFR group compared to the non-BFR group. Small-sided game (SSG) training with the addition of BFR because of accumulated metabolites and hormonal changed leads to substantially greater increases in performance than SSGs training alone.

Abstract

This study aimed to examine the effects of lower limb blood flow restriction (BFR) performed during 3-a-side futsal game training on aerobic and anaerobic performance of futsal players. Twelve male futsal players were randomized into two groups (n = 6); both groups performed ten sessions of the 3-a-side game every other day in half of a futsal court; but one group trained under BFR conditions. Pneumatic cuffs used for the BFR group were inflated to 110% leg systolic blood pressure and increased by 10% after each two completed sessions. Before and after the training sessions subjects completed a series of tests to assess aerobic and anaerobic performances along with changes in blood lactate and anabolic and catabolic hormones. All aerobic and anaerobic performance variables improved in both group after training, however improvements in mean power (12.2%, p = 0.03), run time to fatigue (TTF), (7.1%, p = 0.02) and running economy (RE), (-22.7%, p = 0.01) were significantly greater in the BFR group. There were also significant increases in growth hormone (p = 0.01), testosterone to cortisol ratio at first session (p = 0.01) and rate of lactate removal (p = 0.01) at last session in the BFR group compared to the non-BFR group. Small-sided game (SSG) training with the addition of BFR because of accumulated metabolites and hormonal changed leads to substantially greater increases in performance than SSGs training alone.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of General Practice
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
Health Sciences > Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
Language:English
Date:June 2020
Deposited On:28 May 2020 14:05
Last Modified:29 May 2020 20:00
Publisher:University of Uludag
ISSN:1303-2968
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
PubMed ID:32390731

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