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Astrocyte glutathione maintains endothelial barrier stability


Huang, Sheng-Fu; Othman, Alaa; Koshkin, Alexey; Fischer, Sabrina; Fischer, David; Zamboni, Nicola; Ono, Katsuhiko; Sawa, Tomohiro; Ogunshola, Omolara O (2020). Astrocyte glutathione maintains endothelial barrier stability. Redox Biology, 34:101576.

Abstract

Blood-brain barrier (BBB) impairment clearly accelerates brain disease progression. As ways to prevent injury-induced barrier dysfunction remain elusive, better understanding of how BBB cells interact and modulate barrier integrity is needed. Our metabolomic profiling study showed that cell-specific adaptation to injury correlates well with metabolic reprogramming at the BBB. In particular we noted that primary astrocytes (AC) contain comparatively high levels of glutathione (GSH)-related metabolites compared to primary endothelial cells (EC). Injury significantly disturbed redox balance in EC but not AC motivating us to assess 1) whether an AC-EC GSH shuttle supports barrier stability and 2) the impact of GSH on EC function. Using an isotopic labeling/tracking approach combined with Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (TOF-MS) we prove that AC constantly shuttle GSH to EC even under resting conditions - a flux accelerated by injury conditions in vitro. In correlation, co-culture studies revealed that blocking AC GSH generation and secretion via siRNA-mediated γ-glutamyl cysteine ligase (GCL) knockdown significantly compromises EC barrier integrity. Using different GSH donors, we further show that exogenous GSH supplementation improves barrier function by maintaining organization of tight junction proteins and preventing injury-induced tight junction phosphorylation. Thus the AC GSH shuttle is key for maintaining EC redox homeostasis and BBB stability suggesting GSH supplementation could improve recovery after brain injury.

Abstract

Blood-brain barrier (BBB) impairment clearly accelerates brain disease progression. As ways to prevent injury-induced barrier dysfunction remain elusive, better understanding of how BBB cells interact and modulate barrier integrity is needed. Our metabolomic profiling study showed that cell-specific adaptation to injury correlates well with metabolic reprogramming at the BBB. In particular we noted that primary astrocytes (AC) contain comparatively high levels of glutathione (GSH)-related metabolites compared to primary endothelial cells (EC). Injury significantly disturbed redox balance in EC but not AC motivating us to assess 1) whether an AC-EC GSH shuttle supports barrier stability and 2) the impact of GSH on EC function. Using an isotopic labeling/tracking approach combined with Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (TOF-MS) we prove that AC constantly shuttle GSH to EC even under resting conditions - a flux accelerated by injury conditions in vitro. In correlation, co-culture studies revealed that blocking AC GSH generation and secretion via siRNA-mediated γ-glutamyl cysteine ligase (GCL) knockdown significantly compromises EC barrier integrity. Using different GSH donors, we further show that exogenous GSH supplementation improves barrier function by maintaining organization of tight junction proteins and preventing injury-induced tight junction phosphorylation. Thus the AC GSH shuttle is key for maintaining EC redox homeostasis and BBB stability suggesting GSH supplementation could improve recovery after brain injury.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Functional Genomics Center Zurich
04 Faculty of Medicine > Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP)
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinärwissenschaftliches Institut > Institute of Veterinary Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Scopus Subject Areas:Physical Sciences > Organic Chemistry
Life Sciences > Clinical Biochemistry
Uncontrolled Keywords:Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry, Barrier stability; Blood-brain barrier; Metabolic communication; Neurovascular unit; Redox balance; Tight junction
Language:English
Date:1 July 2020
Deposited On:17 Jun 2020 14:59
Last Modified:23 Apr 2024 01:40
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:2213-2317
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.redox.2020.101576
PubMed ID:32502899
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID31003A_170129
  • : Project TitleMetabolic processes at the blood-brain barrier and their role in vascular dysfunction
  • Content: Accepted Version
  • Language: English
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)