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Shedding Light on the Transcriptomic Dark Matter in Biological Psychiatry: Role of Long Noncoding RNAs in D-cycloserine-Induced Fear Extinction in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder


Malan-Müller, Stefanie; de Souza, Vladimir B C; Daniels, Willie M U; Seedat, Soraya; Robinson, Mark D; Hemmings, Sîan M J (2020). Shedding Light on the Transcriptomic Dark Matter in Biological Psychiatry: Role of Long Noncoding RNAs in D-cycloserine-Induced Fear Extinction in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. Omics : a journal of integrative biology, 24(6):352-369.

Abstract

Biological psychiatry scholarship on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is making strides with new omics technologies. In this context, there is growing recognition that noncoding RNAs are vital for the regulation of gene and protein expression. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) can modulate splicing, influence RNA editing, messenger RNA (mRNA) stability, translation activation, and microRNA–mRNA interactions, are highly abundant in the brain, and have been implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders. The largest subclass of lncRNAs is long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs). We report on lincRNAs and their predicted mRNA targets associated with fear extinction induced by co-administration of D-cycloserine and behavioral fear extinction in a PTSD animal model. Forty-three differentially expressed lincRNAs and 190 differentially expressed mRNAs were found to be associated with fear extinction. Eight lincRNAs were predicted to interact with and regulate 108 of these mRNAs, while seven lincRNAs were predicted to interact with 22 of their pre-mRNA transcripts. Based on the functions of their target mRNAs, we inferred that these lincRNAs bind to nucleotides, ribonucleotides, and proteins; subsequently influence nervous system development, morphology, and immune system functioning; and could be associated with nervous system and mental health disorders. We found the quantitative trait loci that overlapped with fear extinction-related lincRNAs included traits such as serum corticosterone level, neuroinflammation, anxiety, stress, and despair-related responses. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to identify lincRNAs and their RNA targets with a putative role in transcriptional regulation during fear extinction in the context of an animal model of PTSD.

Abstract

Biological psychiatry scholarship on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is making strides with new omics technologies. In this context, there is growing recognition that noncoding RNAs are vital for the regulation of gene and protein expression. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) can modulate splicing, influence RNA editing, messenger RNA (mRNA) stability, translation activation, and microRNA–mRNA interactions, are highly abundant in the brain, and have been implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders. The largest subclass of lncRNAs is long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs). We report on lincRNAs and their predicted mRNA targets associated with fear extinction induced by co-administration of D-cycloserine and behavioral fear extinction in a PTSD animal model. Forty-three differentially expressed lincRNAs and 190 differentially expressed mRNAs were found to be associated with fear extinction. Eight lincRNAs were predicted to interact with and regulate 108 of these mRNAs, while seven lincRNAs were predicted to interact with 22 of their pre-mRNA transcripts. Based on the functions of their target mRNAs, we inferred that these lincRNAs bind to nucleotides, ribonucleotides, and proteins; subsequently influence nervous system development, morphology, and immune system functioning; and could be associated with nervous system and mental health disorders. We found the quantitative trait loci that overlapped with fear extinction-related lincRNAs included traits such as serum corticosterone level, neuroinflammation, anxiety, stress, and despair-related responses. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to identify lincRNAs and their RNA targets with a putative role in transcriptional regulation during fear extinction in the context of an animal model of PTSD.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Life Sciences
08 Research Priority Programs > Evolution in Action: From Genomes to Ecosystems
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Biotechnology
Life Sciences > Biochemistry
Life Sciences > Molecular Medicine
Life Sciences > Molecular Biology
Life Sciences > Genetics
Language:English
Date:1 June 2020
Deposited On:02 Jul 2020 05:34
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 15:21
Publisher:Mary Ann Liebert
ISSN:1536-2310
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1089/omi.2020.0031

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