Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Decompressive Craniectomy Is Associated With Good Quality of Life Up to 10 Years After Rehabilitation From Traumatic Brain Injury


Rauen, Katrin; Reichelt, Lara; Probst, Philipp; Schäpers, Barbara; Müller, Friedemann; Jahn, Klaus; Plesnila, Nikolaus (2020). Decompressive Craniectomy Is Associated With Good Quality of Life Up to 10 Years After Rehabilitation From Traumatic Brain Injury. Critical Care Medicine, 48(8):1157-1164.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES Traumatic brain injury is the number one cause of death in children and young adults and has become increasingly prevalent in the elderly. Decompressive craniectomy prevents intracranial hypertension but does not clearly improve physical outcome 6 months after traumatic brain injury. However, it has not been analyzed if decompressive craniectomy affects traumatic brain injury patients' quality of life in the long term.

DESIGN Therefore, we conducted a cross-sectional study assessing health-related quality of life in traumatic brain injury patients with or without decompressive craniectomy up to 10 years after injury.

SETTING Former critical care patients.

PATIENTS Chronic traumatic brain injury patients having not (n = 37) or having received (n = 98) decompressive craniectomy during the acute treatment.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS The Quality of Life after Brain Injury questionnaire was used as outcome measure with a total score from zero to 100, representing lowest and best health-related quality of life, respectively. Health-related quality of life was compared between patients with or without decompressive craniectomy for the entire cohort, for the traumatic brain injury severity (mild, moderate, severe) measured by the initial Glasgow Coma Scale, for age and time variables (age at traumatic brain injury, age at survey, elapsed time since traumatic brain injury) using the Mann-Whitney U test. Differences were considered significant at a p value of less than 0.05.Decompressive craniectomy was necessary in all initial traumatic brain injury severity groups. Eight percent more decompressive craniectomy patients reported good health-related quality of life with a Quality of Life after Brain Injury total score greater than or equal to 60 compared with the no decompressive craniectomy patients up to 10 years after traumatic brain injury (p = 0.004). Initially, mild classified traumatic brain injury patients had a median Quality of Life after Brain Injury total score of 83 (decompressive craniectomy) versus 62 (no decompressive craniectomy) (p = 0.028). Health-related quality of life regarding physical status was better in decompressive craniectomy patients (p = 0.025). Decompressive craniectomy showed a trend toward better health-related quality of life in the 61-85-year-old reflected by median Quality of Life after Brain Injury total scores of 62 (no decompressive craniectomy) versus 79 (decompressive craniectomy) (p = 0.06).

CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that decompressive craniectomy is associated with good health-related quality of life up to 10 years after traumatic brain injury. Thus, decompressive craniectomy may have an underestimated therapeutic potential after traumatic brain injury.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES Traumatic brain injury is the number one cause of death in children and young adults and has become increasingly prevalent in the elderly. Decompressive craniectomy prevents intracranial hypertension but does not clearly improve physical outcome 6 months after traumatic brain injury. However, it has not been analyzed if decompressive craniectomy affects traumatic brain injury patients' quality of life in the long term.

DESIGN Therefore, we conducted a cross-sectional study assessing health-related quality of life in traumatic brain injury patients with or without decompressive craniectomy up to 10 years after injury.

SETTING Former critical care patients.

PATIENTS Chronic traumatic brain injury patients having not (n = 37) or having received (n = 98) decompressive craniectomy during the acute treatment.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS The Quality of Life after Brain Injury questionnaire was used as outcome measure with a total score from zero to 100, representing lowest and best health-related quality of life, respectively. Health-related quality of life was compared between patients with or without decompressive craniectomy for the entire cohort, for the traumatic brain injury severity (mild, moderate, severe) measured by the initial Glasgow Coma Scale, for age and time variables (age at traumatic brain injury, age at survey, elapsed time since traumatic brain injury) using the Mann-Whitney U test. Differences were considered significant at a p value of less than 0.05.Decompressive craniectomy was necessary in all initial traumatic brain injury severity groups. Eight percent more decompressive craniectomy patients reported good health-related quality of life with a Quality of Life after Brain Injury total score greater than or equal to 60 compared with the no decompressive craniectomy patients up to 10 years after traumatic brain injury (p = 0.004). Initially, mild classified traumatic brain injury patients had a median Quality of Life after Brain Injury total score of 83 (decompressive craniectomy) versus 62 (no decompressive craniectomy) (p = 0.028). Health-related quality of life regarding physical status was better in decompressive craniectomy patients (p = 0.025). Decompressive craniectomy showed a trend toward better health-related quality of life in the 61-85-year-old reflected by median Quality of Life after Brain Injury total scores of 62 (no decompressive craniectomy) versus 79 (decompressive craniectomy) (p = 0.06).

CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that decompressive craniectomy is associated with good health-related quality of life up to 10 years after traumatic brain injury. Thus, decompressive craniectomy may have an underestimated therapeutic potential after traumatic brain injury.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 23 Jul 2020
1 download since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute for Regenerative Medicine (IREM)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 August 2020
Deposited On:23 Jul 2020 16:01
Last Modified:29 Jul 2020 13:04
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0090-3493
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/CCM.0000000000004387
PubMed ID:32433123

Download

Closed Access: Download allowed only for UZH members