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Psychosocial factors promoting resilience during the menopausal transition


Süss, Hannah; Willi, Jasmine; Grub, Jessica; Ehlert, Ulrike (2020). Psychosocial factors promoting resilience during the menopausal transition. Archives of Women's Mental Health:Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

Despite significant biological, psychological, and social challenges in the perimenopause, most women report an overall positive well-being and appear to be resilient to potentially negative effects of this life phase. The objective of this study was to detect psychosocial variables which contribute to resilience in a sample of perimenopausal women. A total of 135 healthy perimenopausal women aged 40-56 years completed a battery of validated psychosocial questionnaires including variables related to resilience, well-being, and mental health. First, using exploratory factor analysis, we examined which of the assessed variables related to resilience can be assigned to a common factor. Second, linear regression analyses were performed to investigate whether a common resilience factor predicts well-being and mental health in the examined sample of women. Optimism (LOT-R-O), emotional stability (BFI-K-N), emotion regulation (ERQ), self-compassion (SCS-D), and self-esteem (RSES) in perimenopausal women can be allocated to a single resilience-associated factor. Regression analyses revealed that this factor is related to higher life satisfaction (SWLS; β = .39, p < .001, adj. R$^{2}$ = .20), lower perceived stress (PSS-10; β = - .55, p < .001, adj. R$^{2}$ = .30), lower psychological distress (BSI-18; β = - .49, p < .001, adj. R$^{2}$ = .22), better general psychological health (GHQ-12; β = - .49, p < .001, adj. R$^{2}$ = .22), milder menopausal complaints (MRS II; β = - .41, p < .001, adj. R$^{2}$ = .18), and lower depressive symptoms (ADS-L; β = - .32, p < .001, adj. R$^{2}$ = .26). The α levels were adjusted for multiple testing. Our findings confirm that several psychosocial variables (optimism, emotional stability, emotion regulation, self-compassion, and self-esteem) can be allocated to one common resilience-associated factor. This resilience factor is strongly related to women's well-being as well as mental health in perimenopause.

Abstract

Despite significant biological, psychological, and social challenges in the perimenopause, most women report an overall positive well-being and appear to be resilient to potentially negative effects of this life phase. The objective of this study was to detect psychosocial variables which contribute to resilience in a sample of perimenopausal women. A total of 135 healthy perimenopausal women aged 40-56 years completed a battery of validated psychosocial questionnaires including variables related to resilience, well-being, and mental health. First, using exploratory factor analysis, we examined which of the assessed variables related to resilience can be assigned to a common factor. Second, linear regression analyses were performed to investigate whether a common resilience factor predicts well-being and mental health in the examined sample of women. Optimism (LOT-R-O), emotional stability (BFI-K-N), emotion regulation (ERQ), self-compassion (SCS-D), and self-esteem (RSES) in perimenopausal women can be allocated to a single resilience-associated factor. Regression analyses revealed that this factor is related to higher life satisfaction (SWLS; β = .39, p < .001, adj. R$^{2}$ = .20), lower perceived stress (PSS-10; β = - .55, p < .001, adj. R$^{2}$ = .30), lower psychological distress (BSI-18; β = - .49, p < .001, adj. R$^{2}$ = .22), better general psychological health (GHQ-12; β = - .49, p < .001, adj. R$^{2}$ = .22), milder menopausal complaints (MRS II; β = - .41, p < .001, adj. R$^{2}$ = .18), and lower depressive symptoms (ADS-L; β = - .32, p < .001, adj. R$^{2}$ = .26). The α levels were adjusted for multiple testing. Our findings confirm that several psychosocial variables (optimism, emotional stability, emotion regulation, self-compassion, and self-esteem) can be allocated to one common resilience-associated factor. This resilience factor is strongly related to women's well-being as well as mental health in perimenopause.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
08 Research Priority Programs > Dynamics of Healthy Aging
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Obstetrics and Gynecology
Health Sciences > Psychiatry and Mental Health
Language:English
Date:27 July 2020
Deposited On:11 Aug 2020 11:11
Last Modified:06 Sep 2020 12:13
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1434-1816
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00737-020-01055-7
PubMed ID:32719937

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