Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

GW190425: Observation of a Compact Binary Coalescence with Total Mass ∼ 3.4 M ⊙


Abbott, B P; et al; Tiwari, Shubhanshu; Haney, Maria; Boetzel, Yannick (2020). GW190425: Observation of a Compact Binary Coalescence with Total Mass ∼ 3.4 M ⊙. Astrophysical Journal Letters, 892(1):L3.

Abstract

On 2019 April 25, the LIGO Livingston detector observed a compact binary coalescence with signal-to-noise ratio 12.9. The Virgo detector was also taking data that did not contribute to detection due to a low signal-to-noise ratio, but were used for subsequent parameter estimation. The 90% credible intervals for the component masses range from $1.12$ to $2.52\,{M}_{\odot }$ ($1.46$–$1.87\,{M}_{\odot }$ if we restrict the dimensionless component spin magnitudes to be smaller than 0.05). These mass parameters are consistent with the individual binary components being neutron stars. However, both the source-frame chirp mass ${1.44}_{-0.02}^{+0.02}\,{M}_{\odot }$ and the total mass ${3.4}_{-0.1}^{+0.3}{M}_{\odot }$ of this system are significantly larger than those of any other known binary neutron star (BNS) system. The possibility that one or both binary components of the system are black holes cannot be ruled out from gravitational-wave data. We discuss possible origins of the system based on its inconsistency with the known Galactic BNS population. Under the assumption that the signal was produced by a BNS coalescence, the local rate of neutron star mergers is updated to 250–2810 $\,{\mathrm{Gpc}}^{-3}\,{\mathrm{yr}}^{-1}$.

Abstract

On 2019 April 25, the LIGO Livingston detector observed a compact binary coalescence with signal-to-noise ratio 12.9. The Virgo detector was also taking data that did not contribute to detection due to a low signal-to-noise ratio, but were used for subsequent parameter estimation. The 90% credible intervals for the component masses range from $1.12$ to $2.52\,{M}_{\odot }$ ($1.46$–$1.87\,{M}_{\odot }$ if we restrict the dimensionless component spin magnitudes to be smaller than 0.05). These mass parameters are consistent with the individual binary components being neutron stars. However, both the source-frame chirp mass ${1.44}_{-0.02}^{+0.02}\,{M}_{\odot }$ and the total mass ${3.4}_{-0.1}^{+0.3}{M}_{\odot }$ of this system are significantly larger than those of any other known binary neutron star (BNS) system. The possibility that one or both binary components of the system are black holes cannot be ruled out from gravitational-wave data. We discuss possible origins of the system based on its inconsistency with the known Galactic BNS population. Under the assumption that the signal was produced by a BNS coalescence, the local rate of neutron star mergers is updated to 250–2810 $\,{\mathrm{Gpc}}^{-3}\,{\mathrm{yr}}^{-1}$.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
910 citations in Web of Science®
1069 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

15 downloads since deposited on 04 Jan 2021
3 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Physics Institute
Dewey Decimal Classification:530 Physics
Scopus Subject Areas:Physical Sciences > Astronomy and Astrophysics
Physical Sciences > Space and Planetary Science
Uncontrolled Keywords:Space and Planetary Science, Astronomy and Astrophysics
Language:English
Date:19 March 2020
Deposited On:04 Jan 2021 12:08
Last Modified:23 Jun 2024 01:41
Publisher:IOP Publishing
ISSN:2041-8205
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3847/2041-8213/ab75f5
  • Content: Published Version
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)