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Interactive effects of social network centrality and social identification on stress


Mojzisch, Andreas; Frisch, Johanna Ute; Doehne, Malte; Reder, Maren; Häusser, Jan Alexander (2020). Interactive effects of social network centrality and social identification on stress. British Journal of Psychology:Epub ahed of print.

Abstract

The present study aimed to integrate the social identity approach to health and well‐being with social network analysis. Previous research on the effects of social network centrality on stress has yielded mixed results. Building on the social identity approach, we argued that these mixed results can be explained, in part, by taking into account the degree to which individuals identify with the social network. We hence hypothesized that the effects of social network centrality on stress are moderated by social identification. Using a full roster method, we assessed the social network of first‐year psychology students right after the start of their study programme and three months later. The effects of network centrality (betweenness, closeness, eigenvector centrality) and social identification on stress were examined using structural equation models. As predicted, our results revealed a significant interaction between network centrality and social identification on stress: For weakly or moderately identified students, network centrality was positively related to stress. By contrast, for strongly identified students, network centrality was unrelated to stress. In conclusion, our results point to the perils of being well‐connected yet not feeling like one belongs to a group.

Abstract

The present study aimed to integrate the social identity approach to health and well‐being with social network analysis. Previous research on the effects of social network centrality on stress has yielded mixed results. Building on the social identity approach, we argued that these mixed results can be explained, in part, by taking into account the degree to which individuals identify with the social network. We hence hypothesized that the effects of social network centrality on stress are moderated by social identification. Using a full roster method, we assessed the social network of first‐year psychology students right after the start of their study programme and three months later. The effects of network centrality (betweenness, closeness, eigenvector centrality) and social identification on stress were examined using structural equation models. As predicted, our results revealed a significant interaction between network centrality and social identification on stress: For weakly or moderately identified students, network centrality was positively related to stress. By contrast, for strongly identified students, network centrality was unrelated to stress. In conclusion, our results point to the perils of being well‐connected yet not feeling like one belongs to a group.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Sociology
Dewey Decimal Classification:300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > General Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:health, social identification, social identity approach, social network analysis, stress, well‐being
Language:English
Date:21 April 2020
Deposited On:13 Aug 2020 09:36
Last Modified:14 Aug 2020 20:00
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0007-1269
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/bjop.12447

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