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Does the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 virus decrease at high-altitude?


Arias-Reyes, Christian; Zubieta-DeUrioste, Natalia; Poma-Machicao, Liliana; Aliaga-Raduan, Fernanda; Carvajal-Rodriguez, Favio; Dutschmann, Mathias; Schneider-Gasser, Edith M; Zubieta-Calleja, Gustavo; Soliz, Jorge (2020). Does the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 virus decrease at high-altitude? Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology, 277:103443.

Abstract

In the present study we analyze the epidemiological data of COVID-19 of Tibet and high-altitude regions of Bolivia and Ecuador, and compare to lowland data, to test the hypothesis that high-altitude inhabitants (+2,500 m above sea-level) are less susceptible to develop severe adverse effects in acute SARS-CoV-2 virus infection. Analysis of available epidemiological data suggest that physiological acclimatization/adaptation that counterbalance the hypoxic environment in high-altitude may protect from severe impact of acute SARS-CoV-2 virus infection. Potential underlying mechanisms such as: (i) a compromised half-live of the virus caused by the high-altitude environment, and (ii) a hypoxia mediated down regulation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), which is the main binding target of SARS-CoV-2 virus in the pulmonary epithelium are discussed.

Abstract

In the present study we analyze the epidemiological data of COVID-19 of Tibet and high-altitude regions of Bolivia and Ecuador, and compare to lowland data, to test the hypothesis that high-altitude inhabitants (+2,500 m above sea-level) are less susceptible to develop severe adverse effects in acute SARS-CoV-2 virus infection. Analysis of available epidemiological data suggest that physiological acclimatization/adaptation that counterbalance the hypoxic environment in high-altitude may protect from severe impact of acute SARS-CoV-2 virus infection. Potential underlying mechanisms such as: (i) a compromised half-live of the virus caused by the high-altitude environment, and (ii) a hypoxia mediated down regulation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), which is the main binding target of SARS-CoV-2 virus in the pulmonary epithelium are discussed.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > General Neuroscience
Life Sciences > Physiology
Health Sciences > Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
Uncontrolled Keywords:Physiology, General Neuroscience, Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
Language:English
Date:1 June 2020
Deposited On:27 Aug 2020 15:31
Last Modified:28 Aug 2020 20:00
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1569-9048
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resp.2020.103443
PubMed ID:32333993

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