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Impact of Early Revascularization on Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Relation to Automatically Quantified Ischemia


Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Using a contemporary, multicenter international single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI) registry, this study characterized the potential major adverse cardiovascular event(s) (MACE) benefit of early revascularization based on automatic quantification of ischemia.

BACKGROUND

Prior single-center data reported an association between moderate to severe ischemia SPECT-MPI and reduced cardiac death with early revascularization.

METHODS

Consecutive patients from a multicenter, international registry who underwent $^{99m}$Tc SPECT-MPI between 2009 and 2014 with solid-state scanners were included. Ischemia was quantified automatically as ischemic total perfusion deficit (TPD). Early revascularization was defined as within 90 days. The primary outcome was MACE (death, myocardial infarction, and unstable angina). A propensity score was developed to adjust for nonrandomization of revascularization; then, multivariable Cox modeling adjusted for propensity score and demographics was used to predict MACE.

RESULTS

In total, 19,088 patients were included, with a mean follow-up of 4.7 ± 1.6 years, during which MACE occurred in 1,836 (9.6%) patients. There was a significant interaction between ischemic TPD modeled as a continuous variable and early revascularization (interaction p value: 0.012). In this model, there was a trend toward reduced MACE in patients with >5.4% ischemic TPD and a significant association with reduced MACE in patients with >10.2% ischemic TPD.

CONCLUSIONS

In this large, international, multicenter study reflecting contemporary cardiology practice, early revascularization of patients with >10.2% ischemia on SPECT-MPI, quantified automatically, was associated with reduced MACE.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Using a contemporary, multicenter international single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI) registry, this study characterized the potential major adverse cardiovascular event(s) (MACE) benefit of early revascularization based on automatic quantification of ischemia.

BACKGROUND

Prior single-center data reported an association between moderate to severe ischemia SPECT-MPI and reduced cardiac death with early revascularization.

METHODS

Consecutive patients from a multicenter, international registry who underwent $^{99m}$Tc SPECT-MPI between 2009 and 2014 with solid-state scanners were included. Ischemia was quantified automatically as ischemic total perfusion deficit (TPD). Early revascularization was defined as within 90 days. The primary outcome was MACE (death, myocardial infarction, and unstable angina). A propensity score was developed to adjust for nonrandomization of revascularization; then, multivariable Cox modeling adjusted for propensity score and demographics was used to predict MACE.

RESULTS

In total, 19,088 patients were included, with a mean follow-up of 4.7 ± 1.6 years, during which MACE occurred in 1,836 (9.6%) patients. There was a significant interaction between ischemic TPD modeled as a continuous variable and early revascularization (interaction p value: 0.012). In this model, there was a trend toward reduced MACE in patients with >5.4% ischemic TPD and a significant association with reduced MACE in patients with >10.2% ischemic TPD.

CONCLUSIONS

In this large, international, multicenter study reflecting contemporary cardiology practice, early revascularization of patients with >10.2% ischemia on SPECT-MPI, quantified automatically, was associated with reduced MACE.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Nuclear Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:16 August 2020
Deposited On:03 Sep 2020 11:40
Last Modified:03 Sep 2020 11:47
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1876-7591
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcmg.2020.05.039
PubMed ID:32828784

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