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Does self‐verifying behavior in job interviews help secure job offers, even if it reveals negative information about the self?


Wilhelmy, Annika; Stühlinger, Manuel; Kim, Kawon; Taphuntsang, Dolker; König, Cornelius J (2020). Does self‐verifying behavior in job interviews help secure job offers, even if it reveals negative information about the self? International Journal of Selection and Assessment, 28(4):430-444.

Abstract

Although research demonstrates that self‐verification striving can have positive outcomes in the hiring process, it remains unclear how this drive to present oneself authentically manifests in candidates’ behavior during job interviews. We examine whether self‐verifying behavior, including revelation of negative information about the self, is related to success in job interviews. Study 1 showed that self‐verification striving among 112 MBA students predicted their self‐verifying behavior during mock job interviews, which in turn led to success in converting interviews into actual offers 6 months later. Using a sample of 102 recent job seekers, Study 2 showed that self‐verification striving was associated with the extent to which candidates disclosed negative information about themselves during real job interviews, ultimately predicting their interview success.

Abstract

Although research demonstrates that self‐verification striving can have positive outcomes in the hiring process, it remains unclear how this drive to present oneself authentically manifests in candidates’ behavior during job interviews. We examine whether self‐verifying behavior, including revelation of negative information about the self, is related to success in job interviews. Study 1 showed that self‐verification striving among 112 MBA students predicted their self‐verifying behavior during mock job interviews, which in turn led to success in converting interviews into actual offers 6 months later. Using a sample of 102 recent job seekers, Study 2 showed that self‐verification striving was associated with the extent to which candidates disclosed negative information about themselves during real job interviews, ultimately predicting their interview success.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > General Business, Management and Accounting
Social Sciences & Humanities > Applied Psychology
Social Sciences & Humanities > General Psychology
Social Sciences & Humanities > Strategy and Management
Social Sciences & Humanities > Management of Technology and Innovation
Uncontrolled Keywords:Management of Technology and Innovation, Applied Psychology, Strategy and Management, General Business, Management and Accounting, General Psychology
Language:English
Date:1 December 2020
Deposited On:08 Sep 2020 08:38
Last Modified:24 May 2024 01:39
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0965-075X
OA Status:Hybrid
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/ijsa.12303
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)