Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The stress–Wnt-signaling axis: a hypothesis for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and therapy approaches


Yde Ohki, Cristine Marie; Grossmann, Leoni; Alber, Emma; Dwivedi, Tanushree; Berger, Gregor; Werling, Anna Maria; Walitza, Susanne; Grünblatt, Edna (2020). The stress–Wnt-signaling axis: a hypothesis for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and therapy approaches. Translational Psychiatry, 10:315.

Abstract

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common psychiatric neurodevelopmental disorders in children and adolescents. Although ADHD has been studied for nearly a century, the cause and pathophysiology of ADHD is yet largely unknown. However, findings from previous studies have resulted in the formation of a new hypothesis: Apart from the well-known multifactorial etiology of ADHD, recent evidence suggests that the interaction between genetic and environmental factors and especially Wnt- and mTOR-signaling pathways might have an important role in the pathophysiology of ADHD. The Wnt-signaling pathway is known to orchestrate cellular proliferation, polarity, and differentiation, and the mTOR pathway is involved in several significant processes of neurodevelopment and synaptic plasticity. As a result, dysregulations of these pathways in a time-dependent manner could lead to neurodevelopmental delays, resulting in ADHD phenotype. This review presents further evidence supporting our hypothesis by combining results from studies on ADHD and Wnt- or mTOR-signaling and the influence of genetics, methylphenidate treatment, Omega-3 supplementation, and stress.

Abstract

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common psychiatric neurodevelopmental disorders in children and adolescents. Although ADHD has been studied for nearly a century, the cause and pathophysiology of ADHD is yet largely unknown. However, findings from previous studies have resulted in the formation of a new hypothesis: Apart from the well-known multifactorial etiology of ADHD, recent evidence suggests that the interaction between genetic and environmental factors and especially Wnt- and mTOR-signaling pathways might have an important role in the pathophysiology of ADHD. The Wnt-signaling pathway is known to orchestrate cellular proliferation, polarity, and differentiation, and the mTOR pathway is involved in several significant processes of neurodevelopment and synaptic plasticity. As a result, dysregulations of these pathways in a time-dependent manner could lead to neurodevelopmental delays, resulting in ADHD phenotype. This review presents further evidence supporting our hypothesis by combining results from studies on ADHD and Wnt- or mTOR-signaling and the influence of genetics, methylphenidate treatment, Omega-3 supplementation, and stress.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics

Altmetrics

Downloads

11 downloads since deposited on 24 Sep 2020
11 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
04 Faculty of Medicine > Neuroscience Center Zurich
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Biological Psychiatry, Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience, Psychiatry and Mental health
Language:English
Date:1 December 2020
Deposited On:24 Sep 2020 13:12
Last Modified:01 Nov 2020 17:10
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:2158-3188
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41398-020-00999-9
PubMed ID:32948744

Download

Gold Open Access

Download PDF  'The stress–Wnt-signaling axis: a hypothesis for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and therapy approaches'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 837kB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)