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Reduced neural satiety responses in women affected by obesity


Gobbi, S; Weber, S C; Graf, G; Hinz, D; Asarian, L; Geary, N; Leeners, B; Hare, Todd A; Tobler, P N (2020). Reduced neural satiety responses in women affected by obesity. Neuroscience, 447:94-112.

Abstract

Overweight and obesity are major risk factors for a number of chronic diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. Obesity rates are on the rise worldwide with women more frequently affected than men. Hedonic responses to food seem to play a key role in obesity, but the exact mechanisms and relationships are still poorly understood. In this study, we investigate the perceived pleasantness of food rewards in relation to satiety and calories consumed during an ad libitum meal in women. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a milkshake consumption task, we studied how experienced food values are encoded in women with healthy weight, overweight or obesity. Participants rated the pleasantness and intensity of high and low caloric milkshakes in the fMRI scanner during both the fasted and fed states. We found differences in the neural responses and experienced pleasantness of high and low caloric milkshakes depending on satiety and Body Mass Index (BMI). Women with both high ad libitum consumption levels and high BMI reported greater experienced pleasantness for milkshakes. In contrast, among women with low ad libitum consumption levels, greater BMI was associated with less experienced pleasantness. At the neural level, satiety affected women with obesity to a lesser degree than women with healthy weight. Thus, having obesity was associated with altered relationships between food consumption and the hedonic responses to food rewards as well as reduced satiety effects in women.

Abstract

Overweight and obesity are major risk factors for a number of chronic diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. Obesity rates are on the rise worldwide with women more frequently affected than men. Hedonic responses to food seem to play a key role in obesity, but the exact mechanisms and relationships are still poorly understood. In this study, we investigate the perceived pleasantness of food rewards in relation to satiety and calories consumed during an ad libitum meal in women. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a milkshake consumption task, we studied how experienced food values are encoded in women with healthy weight, overweight or obesity. Participants rated the pleasantness and intensity of high and low caloric milkshakes in the fMRI scanner during both the fasted and fed states. We found differences in the neural responses and experienced pleasantness of high and low caloric milkshakes depending on satiety and Body Mass Index (BMI). Women with both high ad libitum consumption levels and high BMI reported greater experienced pleasantness for milkshakes. In contrast, among women with low ad libitum consumption levels, greater BMI was associated with less experienced pleasantness. At the neural level, satiety affected women with obesity to a lesser degree than women with healthy weight. Thus, having obesity was associated with altered relationships between food consumption and the hedonic responses to food rewards as well as reduced satiety effects in women.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Economics
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > General Neuroscience
Uncontrolled Keywords:General Neuroscience
Language:English
Date:1 November 2020
Deposited On:07 Oct 2020 13:57
Last Modified:13 Oct 2020 18:07
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0306-4522
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroscience.2020.07.022

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Content: Accepted Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only until 7 October 2021
Size: 5MB
Embargo till: 2021-10-07