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Longitudinal functional brain network reconfiguration in healthy aging


Malagurski, Brigitta; Liem, Franziskus; Oschwald, Jessica; Mérillat, Susan; Jäncke, Lutz (2020). Longitudinal functional brain network reconfiguration in healthy aging. Human Brain Mapping, 41(17):4829-4845.

Abstract

Healthy aging is associated with changes in cognitive performance and functional brain organization. In fact, cross-sectional studies imply lower modularity and significant heterogeneity in modular architecture across older subjects. Here, we used a longitudinal dataset consisting of four occasions of resting-state-fMRI and cognitive testing (spanning 4 years) in 150 healthy older adults. We applied a graph-theoretic analysis to investigate the time-evolving modular structure of the whole-brain network, by maximizing the multilayer modularity across four time points. Global flexibility, which reflects the tendency of brain nodes to switch between modules across time, was significantly higher in healthy elderly than in a temporal null model. Further, global flexibility, as well as network-specific flexibility of the default mode, frontoparietal control, and somatomotor networks, were significantly associated with age at baseline. These results indicate that older age is related to higher variability in modular organization. The temporal metrics were not associated with simultaneous changes in processing speed or learning performance in the context of memory encoding. Finally, this approach provides global indices for longitudinal change across a given time span and it may contribute to uncovering patterns of modular variability in healthy and clinical aging populations.

Abstract

Healthy aging is associated with changes in cognitive performance and functional brain organization. In fact, cross-sectional studies imply lower modularity and significant heterogeneity in modular architecture across older subjects. Here, we used a longitudinal dataset consisting of four occasions of resting-state-fMRI and cognitive testing (spanning 4 years) in 150 healthy older adults. We applied a graph-theoretic analysis to investigate the time-evolving modular structure of the whole-brain network, by maximizing the multilayer modularity across four time points. Global flexibility, which reflects the tendency of brain nodes to switch between modules across time, was significantly higher in healthy elderly than in a temporal null model. Further, global flexibility, as well as network-specific flexibility of the default mode, frontoparietal control, and somatomotor networks, were significantly associated with age at baseline. These results indicate that older age is related to higher variability in modular organization. The temporal metrics were not associated with simultaneous changes in processing speed or learning performance in the context of memory encoding. Finally, this approach provides global indices for longitudinal change across a given time span and it may contribute to uncovering patterns of modular variability in healthy and clinical aging populations.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
08 Research Priority Programs > Dynamics of Healthy Aging
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Anatomy
Health Sciences > Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
Health Sciences > Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Imaging
Life Sciences > Neurology
Health Sciences > Neurology (clinical)
Language:English
Date:1 December 2020
Deposited On:12 Nov 2020 09:50
Last Modified:01 Dec 2020 14:14
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1065-9471
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.25161
PubMed ID:32857461

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