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Serum adiponectin levels are associated with presence of carotid plaque in women with systemic lupus erythematosus


Carbone, Federico; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Poggi, Alessandro; Nobili, Flavio; Cacciapaglia, Fabio; Afeltra, Antonella; Moccetti, Tiziano; Colombo, Barbara M (2020). Serum adiponectin levels are associated with presence of carotid plaque in women with systemic lupus erythematosus. Nutrition, Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Diseases (NMCD), 30(7):1147-1151.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM
Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with accelerated atherogenesis. Traditional risk factors do not seem to fully explain this process in patients with SLE and no other imaging/serum biomarkers have so far improved risk stratification. Here, we focused on the role of adiponectin in women with SLE.
METHODS AND RESULTS
This is a sub-analysis of a validated cohort enrolling eighty females (age 18-65 years) affected by SLE. Patient underwent a single blood sampling and carotid echography. Serum adipocytokines (i.e. leptin, resistin and adiponectin) were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Patients with a carotid plaque (n = 23) were older, with longer duration of the disease, chronic use of corticosteroids, and immunosuppressive therapies. As expected, patients with a carotid plaque had increased vascular risk and high serum levels of inflammatory biomarkers, total and LDL cholesterol and adiponectin. Significant positive correlation between serum adiponectin and presence of a carotid plaque was found independently of patient age, SCORE Risk Charts, duration of disease, and SLE treatments.
CONCLUSIONS
These results indicate that high serum adiponectin is associated with accelerated carotid atherosclerosis in SLE young women and it might be useful to improve vascular risk stratification in this patient setting.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM
Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with accelerated atherogenesis. Traditional risk factors do not seem to fully explain this process in patients with SLE and no other imaging/serum biomarkers have so far improved risk stratification. Here, we focused on the role of adiponectin in women with SLE.
METHODS AND RESULTS
This is a sub-analysis of a validated cohort enrolling eighty females (age 18-65 years) affected by SLE. Patient underwent a single blood sampling and carotid echography. Serum adipocytokines (i.e. leptin, resistin and adiponectin) were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Patients with a carotid plaque (n = 23) were older, with longer duration of the disease, chronic use of corticosteroids, and immunosuppressive therapies. As expected, patients with a carotid plaque had increased vascular risk and high serum levels of inflammatory biomarkers, total and LDL cholesterol and adiponectin. Significant positive correlation between serum adiponectin and presence of a carotid plaque was found independently of patient age, SCORE Risk Charts, duration of disease, and SLE treatments.
CONCLUSIONS
These results indicate that high serum adiponectin is associated with accelerated carotid atherosclerosis in SLE young women and it might be useful to improve vascular risk stratification in this patient setting.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Cardiocentro Ticino
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Medicine (miscellaneous)
Health Sciences > Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
Health Sciences > Nutrition and Dietetics
Health Sciences > Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
Language:English
Date:25 June 2020
Deposited On:21 Oct 2020 10:37
Last Modified:22 Oct 2020 20:00
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0939-4753
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.numecd.2020.03.020
PubMed ID:32451275

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