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An In-Bore Receiver for Magnetic Resonance Imaging


Reber, Jonas; Marjanovic, Josip; Brunner, David O; Port, Andreas; Schmid, Thomas; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Moser, Urs; Barmet, Christoph; Pruessmann, Klaas P (2020). An In-Bore Receiver for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging, 39(4):997-1007.

Abstract

In magnetic resonance imaging, the use of array detection and the number of detector elements have seen a steady increase over the past two decades. As a result, per-channel analog connection via long coaxial cable, as commonly used, poses an increasing challenge in terms of handling, safety, and coupling among cables. This situation is exacerbated when complementary recording of radiofrequency transmission or NMR-based magnetic field sensing further add to channel counts. A generic way of addressing this trend is the transition to digital signal transmission, enabled by digitization and first-level digital processing close to detector coils and sensors in the magnet bore. The foremost challenge that comes with this approach is to achieve high dynamic range, linearity, and phase stability despite interference by strong static, audiofrequency, and radiofrequency fields. The present work reports implementation of a 16-channel in-bore receiver, performing signal digitization and processing with subsequent optical transmission over fiber. Along with descriptions of the system design and construction, performance evaluation is reported. The resulting device is fully MRI compatible providing practically equal performance and signal quality compared to state-of-the-art RF digitizers operating outside the magnet. Its use is demonstrated by examples of head imaging and magnetic field recording.

Abstract

In magnetic resonance imaging, the use of array detection and the number of detector elements have seen a steady increase over the past two decades. As a result, per-channel analog connection via long coaxial cable, as commonly used, poses an increasing challenge in terms of handling, safety, and coupling among cables. This situation is exacerbated when complementary recording of radiofrequency transmission or NMR-based magnetic field sensing further add to channel counts. A generic way of addressing this trend is the transition to digital signal transmission, enabled by digitization and first-level digital processing close to detector coils and sensors in the magnet bore. The foremost challenge that comes with this approach is to achieve high dynamic range, linearity, and phase stability despite interference by strong static, audiofrequency, and radiofrequency fields. The present work reports implementation of a 16-channel in-bore receiver, performing signal digitization and processing with subsequent optical transmission over fiber. Along with descriptions of the system design and construction, performance evaluation is reported. The resulting device is fully MRI compatible providing practically equal performance and signal quality compared to state-of-the-art RF digitizers operating outside the magnet. Its use is demonstrated by examples of head imaging and magnetic field recording.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Physical Sciences > Software
Health Sciences > Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
Physical Sciences > Computer Science Applications
Physical Sciences > Electrical and Electronic Engineering
Uncontrolled Keywords:Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Radiological and Ultrasound Technology, Software, Computer Science Applications
Language:English
Date:1 April 2020
Deposited On:30 Oct 2020 15:46
Last Modified:31 Oct 2020 21:00
Publisher:Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
ISSN:0278-0062
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1109/tmi.2019.2939090
PubMed ID:31484112

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