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Management of active surveillance-eligible prostate cancer during pretransplantation workup of patients with kidney failure: a simulation study


Bieri, Uwe; Hübel, Kerstin; Seeger, Harald; Kulkarni, Girish S; Sulser, Tullio; Hermanns, Thomas; Wettstein, Marian S (2020). Management of active surveillance-eligible prostate cancer during pretransplantation workup of patients with kidney failure: a simulation study. Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, 15(6):822-829.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The general rule that every active malignancy is an absolute contraindication for kidney transplantation is challenged by kidney failure patients diagnosed with active surveillance-eligible prostate cancer during pretransplantation workup. Interdisciplinary treatment teams therefore often face the challenge of balancing the benefits of early kidney transplantation and the risk of metastatic progression. Hence, we compared the quality-adjusted life expectancy of different management strategies in kidney failure patients diagnosed with active surveillance-eligible prostate cancer during pretransplantation workup.
DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: A discrete event simulation model was developed on the basis of a systematic literature search, clinical guidelines, and expert opinion. After model validation and calibration, we simulated four management strategies in a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 patients: Definitive treatment (surgery or radiation therapy) and listing after a waiting period of 2 years, definitive treatment and immediate listing, active surveillance and listing after a waiting period of 2 years, and active surveillance and immediate listing. Individual patient results (quality-adjusted life years; QALYs) were aggregated into strategy-specific means (± SEs).
RESULTS Active surveillance and immediate listing yielded the highest amount of quality-adjusted life expectancy (6.97 ± 0.01 QALYs) followed by definitive treatment and immediate listing (6.75 ± 0.01 QALYs). These two strategies involving immediate listing not only outperformed those incorporating a waiting period of 2 years (definitive treatment: 6.32 ± 0.01 QALYs; active surveillance: 6.59 ± 0.01 QALYs) but also yielded a higher proportion of successfully performed transplantations (72% and 74% versus 56% and 59%), with less time on hemodialysis on average (4.02 and 3.81 years versus 4.80 and 4.65 years).
CONCLUSIONS: Among kidney failure patients diagnosed with active surveillance-eligible prostate cancer during pretransplantation workup, the active surveillance and immediate listing strategy outperformed the alternative management strategies from a quality of life expectancy perspective, followed by definitive treatment and immediate listing.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The general rule that every active malignancy is an absolute contraindication for kidney transplantation is challenged by kidney failure patients diagnosed with active surveillance-eligible prostate cancer during pretransplantation workup. Interdisciplinary treatment teams therefore often face the challenge of balancing the benefits of early kidney transplantation and the risk of metastatic progression. Hence, we compared the quality-adjusted life expectancy of different management strategies in kidney failure patients diagnosed with active surveillance-eligible prostate cancer during pretransplantation workup.
DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: A discrete event simulation model was developed on the basis of a systematic literature search, clinical guidelines, and expert opinion. After model validation and calibration, we simulated four management strategies in a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 patients: Definitive treatment (surgery or radiation therapy) and listing after a waiting period of 2 years, definitive treatment and immediate listing, active surveillance and listing after a waiting period of 2 years, and active surveillance and immediate listing. Individual patient results (quality-adjusted life years; QALYs) were aggregated into strategy-specific means (± SEs).
RESULTS Active surveillance and immediate listing yielded the highest amount of quality-adjusted life expectancy (6.97 ± 0.01 QALYs) followed by definitive treatment and immediate listing (6.75 ± 0.01 QALYs). These two strategies involving immediate listing not only outperformed those incorporating a waiting period of 2 years (definitive treatment: 6.32 ± 0.01 QALYs; active surveillance: 6.59 ± 0.01 QALYs) but also yielded a higher proportion of successfully performed transplantations (72% and 74% versus 56% and 59%), with less time on hemodialysis on average (4.02 and 3.81 years versus 4.80 and 4.65 years).
CONCLUSIONS: Among kidney failure patients diagnosed with active surveillance-eligible prostate cancer during pretransplantation workup, the active surveillance and immediate listing strategy outperformed the alternative management strategies from a quality of life expectancy perspective, followed by definitive treatment and immediate listing.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Nephrology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Urological Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Visceral and Transplantation Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Epidemiology
Health Sciences > Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
Health Sciences > Nephrology
Health Sciences > Transplantation
Language:English
Date:8 June 2020
Deposited On:02 Nov 2020 15:52
Last Modified:28 Feb 2021 08:01
Publisher:American Society of Nephrology
ISSN:1555-9041
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.2215/CJN.14041119
PubMed ID:32381585

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