Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Extending sleep to confirm insufficient sleep syndrome is challenging


Baumann-Vogel, Heide; Hoff, Sophia; Valko, Philipp O; Poryazova, Rositsa; Werth, Esther; Baumann, Christian R (2020). Extending sleep to confirm insufficient sleep syndrome is challenging. Journal of Sleep Research:Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

Insufficient sleep syndrome (ISS) is prevalent, but poorly studied. This descriptive study was performed to determine its diagnostic challenges and clinical characteristics in a large (n = 3,461) retrospective sample from a single sleep laboratory. Based on actigraphy, polysomnography and multiple sleep latency tests, we diagnosed "suspected insufficient sleep syndrome" in patients with chronic sleepiness, short time in bed, longer sleep duration during weekends or vacation, and without evidence of other causes of sleepiness. For the diagnosis of "definite insufficient sleep syndrome", we additionally required objectively confirmed resolution of sleepiness with actigraphy-documented extension of time in bed. We diagnosed "suspected insufficient sleep syndrome" in 300 subjects. In 94 subjects, extension of sleep time with consecutive relief of sleepiness was attempted, but only 37 subjects succeeded, often despite being offered several attempts. "Definite insufficient sleep syndrome" was confirmed in 36 patients. In these subjects, mean time in bed after sleep extension was above 8 hr per night and 84 min longer than at baseline. Narcolepsy-like findings were frequently observed before sleep extension, but no sleep onset rapid eye movement sleep on polysomnography. This study indicates that fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of ISS is challenging in clinical practice. It further corroborates the importance of actigraphy and polysomnography for correct diagnosis.

Abstract

Insufficient sleep syndrome (ISS) is prevalent, but poorly studied. This descriptive study was performed to determine its diagnostic challenges and clinical characteristics in a large (n = 3,461) retrospective sample from a single sleep laboratory. Based on actigraphy, polysomnography and multiple sleep latency tests, we diagnosed "suspected insufficient sleep syndrome" in patients with chronic sleepiness, short time in bed, longer sleep duration during weekends or vacation, and without evidence of other causes of sleepiness. For the diagnosis of "definite insufficient sleep syndrome", we additionally required objectively confirmed resolution of sleepiness with actigraphy-documented extension of time in bed. We diagnosed "suspected insufficient sleep syndrome" in 300 subjects. In 94 subjects, extension of sleep time with consecutive relief of sleepiness was attempted, but only 37 subjects succeeded, often despite being offered several attempts. "Definite insufficient sleep syndrome" was confirmed in 36 patients. In these subjects, mean time in bed after sleep extension was above 8 hr per night and 84 min longer than at baseline. Narcolepsy-like findings were frequently observed before sleep extension, but no sleep onset rapid eye movement sleep on polysomnography. This study indicates that fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of ISS is challenging in clinical practice. It further corroborates the importance of actigraphy and polysomnography for correct diagnosis.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
1 citation in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 19 Nov 2020
1 download since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Cognitive Neuroscience
Life Sciences > Behavioral Neuroscience
Language:English
Date:18 June 2020
Deposited On:19 Nov 2020 07:02
Last Modified:20 Nov 2020 21:00
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0962-1105
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/jsr.13109
PubMed ID:32557957

Download

Closed Access: Download allowed only for UZH members

Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only until 1 June 2021
Size: 71kB
View at publisher
Embargo till: 2021-06-01