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Neural arbitration between social and individual learning systems


Diaconescu, Andreea Oliviana; Stecy, Madeline; Kasper, Lars; Burke, Christopher John; Nagy, Zoltan; Mathys, Christoph; Tobler, Philippe N (2020). Neural arbitration between social and individual learning systems. eLife, (9):e54051.

Abstract

Decision making requires integrating knowledge gathered from personal experiences with advice from others. The neural underpinnings of the process of arbitrating between information sources has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we formalized arbitration as the relative precision of predictions, afforded by each learning system, using hierarchical Bayesian modeling. In a probabilistic learning task, participants predicted the outcome of a lottery using recommendations from a more informed advisor and/or self-sampled outcomes. Decision confidence, as measured by the number of points participants wagered on their predictions, varied with our definition of arbitration as a ratio of precisions. Functional neuroimaging demonstrated that arbitration signals were independent of decision confidence and involved modality-specific brain regions. Arbitrating in favor of self-gathered information activated the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the midbrain, whereas arbitrating in favor of social information engaged the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and the amygdala. These findings indicate that relative precision captures arbitration between social and individual learning systems at both behavioral and neural levels.

Abstract

Decision making requires integrating knowledge gathered from personal experiences with advice from others. The neural underpinnings of the process of arbitrating between information sources has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we formalized arbitration as the relative precision of predictions, afforded by each learning system, using hierarchical Bayesian modeling. In a probabilistic learning task, participants predicted the outcome of a lottery using recommendations from a more informed advisor and/or self-sampled outcomes. Decision confidence, as measured by the number of points participants wagered on their predictions, varied with our definition of arbitration as a ratio of precisions. Functional neuroimaging demonstrated that arbitration signals were independent of decision confidence and involved modality-specific brain regions. Arbitrating in favor of self-gathered information activated the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the midbrain, whereas arbitrating in favor of social information engaged the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and the amygdala. These findings indicate that relative precision captures arbitration between social and individual learning systems at both behavioral and neural levels.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Economics
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > General Neuroscience
Life Sciences > General Immunology and Microbiology
Life Sciences > General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
Uncontrolled Keywords:General biochemistry, genetics and molecular biology, general immunology and microbiology, general neuroscience, general medicine
Language:English
Date:11 August 2020
Deposited On:06 Nov 2020 13:35
Last Modified:08 Jan 2021 15:12
Publisher:eLife Sciences Publications Ltd.
ISSN:2050-084X
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.7554/elife.54051
Related URLs:https://www.zora.uzh.ch/id/eprint/184291/
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant IDPZ00P3_167952
  • : Project TitleNeurocomputational Modelling of Delusions and its Clinical Utility for Psychosis
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID100019_176016
  • : Project TitleMechanisms for social learning
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID100014_165884
  • : Project TitleThe role of dopamine in value-based decision making
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant IDPP00P1_150739
  • : Project TitleThe neural basis of economic and moral utility
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant IDPZ00P3_167952
  • : Project TitleNeurocomputational Modelling of Delusions and its Clinical Utility for Psychosis
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID100019_176016
  • : Project TitleMechanisms for social learning
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID100014_165884
  • : Project TitleThe role of dopamine in value-based decision making
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant IDPP00P1_150739
  • : Project TitleThe neural basis of economic and moral utility
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant IDPZ00P3_167952
  • : Project TitleNeurocomputational Modelling of Delusions and its Clinical Utility for Psychosis
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID100019_176016
  • : Project TitleMechanisms for social learning
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID100014_165884
  • : Project TitleThe role of dopamine in value-based decision making
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant IDPP00P1_150739
  • : Project TitleThe neural basis of economic and moral utility
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant IDPZ00P3_167952
  • : Project TitleNeurocomputational Modelling of Delusions and its Clinical Utility for Psychosis
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID100019_176016
  • : Project TitleMechanisms for social learning
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID100014_165884
  • : Project TitleThe role of dopamine in value-based decision making
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant IDPP00P1_150739
  • : Project TitleThe neural basis of economic and moral utility

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