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Prion protein NMR structure and familial human spongiform encephalopathies


Riek, R; Wider, G; Billeter, M; Hornemann, Simone; Glockshuber, R; Wuthrich, K (1998). Prion protein NMR structure and familial human spongiform encephalopathies. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 95(20):11667-11672.

Abstract

The refined NMR structure of the mouse prion protein domain mPrP(121-231) and the recently reported NMR structure of the complete 208-residue polypeptide chain of mPrP are used to investigate the structural basis of inherited human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. In the cellular form of mPrP no spatial clustering of mutation sites is observed that would indicate the existence of disease-specific subdomains. A hydrogen bond between residues 128 and 178 provides a structural basis for the observed highly specific influence of a polymorphism in position 129 in human PrP on the disease phenotype that segregates with the mutation Asp-178-Asn. Overall, the NMR structure implies that only part of the disease-related amino acid replacements lead to reduced stability of the cellular form of PrP, indicating that subtle structural differences in the mutant proteins may affect intermolecular signaling in a variety of different ways.

Abstract

The refined NMR structure of the mouse prion protein domain mPrP(121-231) and the recently reported NMR structure of the complete 208-residue polypeptide chain of mPrP are used to investigate the structural basis of inherited human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. In the cellular form of mPrP no spatial clustering of mutation sites is observed that would indicate the existence of disease-specific subdomains. A hydrogen bond between residues 128 and 178 provides a structural basis for the observed highly specific influence of a polymorphism in position 129 in human PrP on the disease phenotype that segregates with the mutation Asp-178-Asn. Overall, the NMR structure implies that only part of the disease-related amino acid replacements lead to reduced stability of the cellular form of PrP, indicating that subtle structural differences in the mutant proteins may affect intermolecular signaling in a variety of different ways.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Neuropathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Multidisciplinary
Uncontrolled Keywords:Multidisciplinary
Language:English
Date:29 September 1998
Deposited On:11 Nov 2020 15:02
Last Modified:01 Dec 2020 14:19
Publisher:National Academy of Sciences
ISSN:0027-8424
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.95.20.11667
PubMed ID:9751723

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