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Cytochrome P450 and ABCB1 genetics: association with quetiapine and norquetiapine plasma and cerebrospinal fluid concentrations and with clinical response in patients suffering from schizophrenia. A pilot study


Nikisch, Georg; Baumann, Pierre; Oneda, Beatrice; Kiessling, Bernhard; Weisser, Heike; Mathé, Aleksander A; Yoshitake, Takashi; Kehr, Jan; Wiedemann, Georg; Eap, Chin B (2011). Cytochrome P450 and ABCB1 genetics: association with quetiapine and norquetiapine plasma and cerebrospinal fluid concentrations and with clinical response in patients suffering from schizophrenia. A pilot study. Journal of Psychopharmacology, 25(7):896-907.

Abstract

Variability in response to atypical antipsychotic drugs is due to genetic and environmental factors. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms are implicated in the metabolism of drugs, while the P-glycoprotein transporter (P-gp), encoded by the ABCB1 gene, may influence both the blood and brain drug concentrations. This study aimed to identify the possible associations of CYP and ABCB1 genetic polymorphisms with quetiapine and norquetiapine plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations and with response to treatment. Twenty-two patients with schizophrenia receiving 600 mg of quetiapine daily were genotyped for four CYP isoforms and ABCB1 polymorphisms. Quetiapine and norquetiapine peak plasma and CSF concentrations were measured after 4 weeks of treatment. Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that ABCB1 3435C > T (rs1045642), 2677G > T (rs2032582) and 1236C > T (rs1128503) polymorphisms predicted plasma quetiapine concentrations, explaining 41% of the variability (p = 0.001). Furthermore, the ABCB1 polymorphisms predicted 48% (p = 0.024) of the variability of the Δ PANSS total score, with the non-carriers of the 3435TT showing higher changes in the score. These results suggest that ABCB1 genetic polymorphisms may be a predictive marker of quetiapine treatment in schizophrenia.

Abstract

Variability in response to atypical antipsychotic drugs is due to genetic and environmental factors. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms are implicated in the metabolism of drugs, while the P-glycoprotein transporter (P-gp), encoded by the ABCB1 gene, may influence both the blood and brain drug concentrations. This study aimed to identify the possible associations of CYP and ABCB1 genetic polymorphisms with quetiapine and norquetiapine plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations and with response to treatment. Twenty-two patients with schizophrenia receiving 600 mg of quetiapine daily were genotyped for four CYP isoforms and ABCB1 polymorphisms. Quetiapine and norquetiapine peak plasma and CSF concentrations were measured after 4 weeks of treatment. Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that ABCB1 3435C > T (rs1045642), 2677G > T (rs2032582) and 1236C > T (rs1128503) polymorphisms predicted plasma quetiapine concentrations, explaining 41% of the variability (p = 0.001). Furthermore, the ABCB1 polymorphisms predicted 48% (p = 0.024) of the variability of the Δ PANSS total score, with the non-carriers of the 3435TT showing higher changes in the score. These results suggest that ABCB1 genetic polymorphisms may be a predictive marker of quetiapine treatment in schizophrenia.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Genetics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Pharmacology
Health Sciences > Psychiatry and Mental Health
Health Sciences > Pharmacology (medical)
Language:English
Date:July 2011
Deposited On:26 Nov 2020 13:23
Last Modified:23 Apr 2024 01:47
Publisher:Sage Publications
ISSN:0269-8811
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/0269881110389208
PubMed ID:21148022