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Intraocular Pressure Changes and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Inhibitor Use in Various Retinal Diseases: Long-Term Outcomes in Routine Clinical Practice: Data from the Fight Retinal Blindness! Registry


Gabrielle, Pierre-Henry; Nguyen, Vuong; Wolff, Benjamin; Essex, Rohan; Young, Stephanie; Hunt, Adrian; Gemmy Cheung, Chui Ming; Arnold, Jennifer J; Barthelmes, Daniel; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine; Gillies, Mark (2020). Intraocular Pressure Changes and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Inhibitor Use in Various Retinal Diseases: Long-Term Outcomes in Routine Clinical Practice: Data from the Fight Retinal Blindness! Registry. Ophthalmology Retina, 4(9):861-870.

Abstract

PURPOSE
To report long-term changes in intraocular pressure (IOP) in eyes receiving vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors for various retinal conditions over 12 and 24 months in routine clinical practice.

DESIGN
Retrospective analysis of data from a prospectively designed observational outcomes registry, the Fight Retinal Blindness! Project

PARTICIPANTS
Treatment-naïve eyes receiving monotherapy with VEGF inhibitors (ranibizumab [0.5 mg], aflibercept [2 mg], or bevacizumab [1 mg]) with at least 3 injections from December 2013 through December 31, 2018, and at least 12 months of follow-up.

METHODS
Intraocular pressure was measured at each clinical visit for all eyes as part of routine practice.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES
The primary outcome was the mean change in IOP (in millimeters of mercury) at 12 months. The following secondary IOP outcome measures were investigated at 12 and 24 months: (1) mean change in IOP from baseline and (2) proportion of clinically significant IOP increase defined as an elevation of at least 6 mmHg to an IOP of more than 21 mmHg at any point during the follow-up.

RESULTS
We identified 3429 treatment-naïve eyes (395 receiving bevacizumab, 1138 receiving aflibercept, and 1896 receiving ranibizumab) with complete IOP data from 3032 patients with 12 months of follow-up data, of which 2125 (62%) had 24 months of follow-up data. The overall mean IOP change was -0.5 mmHg (95% confidence interval CI, -0.6 to -0.3 mmHg) at 12 months and -0.4 mmHg (95% CI, -0.6 to -0.3 mmHg) at 24 months, whereas the proportions of clinically significant IOP increases were 5.6% and 8.8%, respectively. A lower mean IOP change and fewer IOP elevations at 12 and 24 months was observed in eyes receiving aflibercept than in those receiving bevacizumab and ranibizumab (P ≤ 0.01 for both comparisons at each time point and outcome). Eyes with pre-existing glaucoma demonstrated more IOP increases over 12 and 24 months (odds ratio [OR], 2.2 [95% CI, 1.2-3.8; P = 0.012] and 2.1 [95% CI, 1.1-3.8; P = 0.025], respectively).

CONCLUSIONS
Mean IOP did not change significantly from baseline to 12 and 24 months in eyes receiving VEGF inhibitors, whereas clinically significant IOP elevations occurred in a small proportion of eyes. Aflibercept was associated with fewer clinically significant IOP elevations, whereas eyes with pre-existing glaucoma were at a higher risk.

Abstract

PURPOSE
To report long-term changes in intraocular pressure (IOP) in eyes receiving vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors for various retinal conditions over 12 and 24 months in routine clinical practice.

DESIGN
Retrospective analysis of data from a prospectively designed observational outcomes registry, the Fight Retinal Blindness! Project

PARTICIPANTS
Treatment-naïve eyes receiving monotherapy with VEGF inhibitors (ranibizumab [0.5 mg], aflibercept [2 mg], or bevacizumab [1 mg]) with at least 3 injections from December 2013 through December 31, 2018, and at least 12 months of follow-up.

METHODS
Intraocular pressure was measured at each clinical visit for all eyes as part of routine practice.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES
The primary outcome was the mean change in IOP (in millimeters of mercury) at 12 months. The following secondary IOP outcome measures were investigated at 12 and 24 months: (1) mean change in IOP from baseline and (2) proportion of clinically significant IOP increase defined as an elevation of at least 6 mmHg to an IOP of more than 21 mmHg at any point during the follow-up.

RESULTS
We identified 3429 treatment-naïve eyes (395 receiving bevacizumab, 1138 receiving aflibercept, and 1896 receiving ranibizumab) with complete IOP data from 3032 patients with 12 months of follow-up data, of which 2125 (62%) had 24 months of follow-up data. The overall mean IOP change was -0.5 mmHg (95% confidence interval CI, -0.6 to -0.3 mmHg) at 12 months and -0.4 mmHg (95% CI, -0.6 to -0.3 mmHg) at 24 months, whereas the proportions of clinically significant IOP increases were 5.6% and 8.8%, respectively. A lower mean IOP change and fewer IOP elevations at 12 and 24 months was observed in eyes receiving aflibercept than in those receiving bevacizumab and ranibizumab (P ≤ 0.01 for both comparisons at each time point and outcome). Eyes with pre-existing glaucoma demonstrated more IOP increases over 12 and 24 months (odds ratio [OR], 2.2 [95% CI, 1.2-3.8; P = 0.012] and 2.1 [95% CI, 1.1-3.8; P = 0.025], respectively).

CONCLUSIONS
Mean IOP did not change significantly from baseline to 12 and 24 months in eyes receiving VEGF inhibitors, whereas clinically significant IOP elevations occurred in a small proportion of eyes. Aflibercept was associated with fewer clinically significant IOP elevations, whereas eyes with pre-existing glaucoma were at a higher risk.

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Additional indexing

Contributors:Fight Retinal Blindness! Study Group
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Ophthalmology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Ophthalmology
Language:English
Date:September 2020
Deposited On:01 Dec 2020 15:58
Last Modified:02 Dec 2020 21:00
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:2468-6530
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.oret.2020.06.020
PubMed ID:32574830

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