Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Characterization of overnight slow-wave slope changes across development in an age-, amplitude-, and region-dependent manner


Jaramillo, Valeria; Volk, Carina; Maric, Angelina; Furrer, Melanie; Fattinger, Sara; Kurth, Salome; Lustenberger, Caroline; Huber, Reto (2020). Characterization of overnight slow-wave slope changes across development in an age-, amplitude-, and region-dependent manner. Sleep, 43(9):zsaa038.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES

The restorative function of sleep has been linked to a net reduction in synaptic strength. The slope of slow-waves, a major characteristic of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, has been shown to directly reflect synaptic strength, when accounting for amplitude changes across the night. In this study, we aimed to investigate overnight slope changes in the course of development in an age-, amplitude-, and region-dependent manner.

METHODS

All-night high-density electroencephalography data were analyzed in a cross-sectional population of 60 healthy participants in the age range of 8-29 years. To control for amplitude changes across the night, we matched slow-waves from the first and the last hour of NREM sleep according to their amplitude.

RESULTS

We found a reduction of slow-wave slopes from the first to the last hour of NREM sleep across all investigated ages, amplitudes, and most brain regions. The overnight slope change was largest in children and decreased toward early adulthood. A topographical analysis revealed regional differences in slope change. Specifically, for small amplitude waves the decrease was smallest in an occipital area, whereas for large amplitude waves, the decrease was smallest in a central area.

CONCLUSIONS

The larger slope decrease in children might be indicative of a boosted renormalization of synapses during sleep in childhood, which, in turn, might be related to increased plasticity during brain maturation. Regional differences in the extent of slow-wave slope reduction may reflect a "smart" down-selection process or, alternatively, indicate amplitude-dependent differences in the generation of slow-waves.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES

The restorative function of sleep has been linked to a net reduction in synaptic strength. The slope of slow-waves, a major characteristic of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, has been shown to directly reflect synaptic strength, when accounting for amplitude changes across the night. In this study, we aimed to investigate overnight slope changes in the course of development in an age-, amplitude-, and region-dependent manner.

METHODS

All-night high-density electroencephalography data were analyzed in a cross-sectional population of 60 healthy participants in the age range of 8-29 years. To control for amplitude changes across the night, we matched slow-waves from the first and the last hour of NREM sleep according to their amplitude.

RESULTS

We found a reduction of slow-wave slopes from the first to the last hour of NREM sleep across all investigated ages, amplitudes, and most brain regions. The overnight slope change was largest in children and decreased toward early adulthood. A topographical analysis revealed regional differences in slope change. Specifically, for small amplitude waves the decrease was smallest in an occipital area, whereas for large amplitude waves, the decrease was smallest in a central area.

CONCLUSIONS

The larger slope decrease in children might be indicative of a boosted renormalization of synapses during sleep in childhood, which, in turn, might be related to increased plasticity during brain maturation. Regional differences in the extent of slow-wave slope reduction may reflect a "smart" down-selection process or, alternatively, indicate amplitude-dependent differences in the generation of slow-waves.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Neurology (clinical)
Health Sciences > Physiology (medical)
Language:English
Date:14 September 2020
Deposited On:02 Dec 2020 12:05
Last Modified:04 Jan 2021 15:55
Publisher:American Academy of Sleep Medicine
ISSN:0161-8105
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsaa038
PubMed ID:32154557

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library