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Effect of cocoa on the brain and gut in healthy subjects: a randomised controlled trial


Fox, Mark; Meyer-Gerspach, Anne Christin; Wendebourg, Maria Janina; Gruber, Maja; Heinrich, Henriette; Sauter, Matthias; Woelnerhanssen, Bettina; Koeberle, Dieter; Juengling, Freimut (2019). Effect of cocoa on the brain and gut in healthy subjects: a randomised controlled trial. The British Journal of Nutrition, 121(6):654-661.

Abstract

Dark chocolate is claimed to have effects on gastrointestinal function and to improve well-being. This randomised controlled study tested the hypothesis that cocoa slows gastric emptying and intestinal transit. Functional brain imaging identified central effects of cocoa on cortical activity. Healthy volunteers (HV) ingested 100 g dark (72 % cocoa) or white (0 % cocoa) chocolate for 5 d, in randomised order. Participants recorded abdominal symptoms and stool consistency by the Bristol Stool Score (BSS). Gastric emptying (GE) and intestinal and colonic transit time were assessed by scintigraphy and marker studies, respectively. Combined positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) imaging assessed regional brain activity. A total of sixteen HV (seven females and nine males) completed the studies (mean age 34 (21-58) years, BMI 22·8 (18·5-26·0) kg/m2). Dark chocolate had no effect on upper gastrointestinal function (GE half-time 82 (75-120) v. 83 (60-120) min; P=0·937); however, stool consistency was increased (BSS 3 (3-5) v. 4 (4-6); P=0·011) and there was a trend to slower colonic transit (17 (13-26) v. 21 (15-47) h; P=0·075). PET-CT imaging showed increased [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in the visual cortex, with increased FDG uptake also in somatosensory, motor and pre-frontal cortices (P<0·001). In conclusion, dark chocolate with a high cocoa content has effects on colonic and cerebral function in HV. Future research will assess its effects in patients with functional gastrointestinal diseases with disturbed bowel function and psychological complaints.

Abstract

Dark chocolate is claimed to have effects on gastrointestinal function and to improve well-being. This randomised controlled study tested the hypothesis that cocoa slows gastric emptying and intestinal transit. Functional brain imaging identified central effects of cocoa on cortical activity. Healthy volunteers (HV) ingested 100 g dark (72 % cocoa) or white (0 % cocoa) chocolate for 5 d, in randomised order. Participants recorded abdominal symptoms and stool consistency by the Bristol Stool Score (BSS). Gastric emptying (GE) and intestinal and colonic transit time were assessed by scintigraphy and marker studies, respectively. Combined positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) imaging assessed regional brain activity. A total of sixteen HV (seven females and nine males) completed the studies (mean age 34 (21-58) years, BMI 22·8 (18·5-26·0) kg/m2). Dark chocolate had no effect on upper gastrointestinal function (GE half-time 82 (75-120) v. 83 (60-120) min; P=0·937); however, stool consistency was increased (BSS 3 (3-5) v. 4 (4-6); P=0·011) and there was a trend to slower colonic transit (17 (13-26) v. 21 (15-47) h; P=0·075). PET-CT imaging showed increased [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in the visual cortex, with increased FDG uptake also in somatosensory, motor and pre-frontal cortices (P<0·001). In conclusion, dark chocolate with a high cocoa content has effects on colonic and cerebral function in HV. Future research will assess its effects in patients with functional gastrointestinal diseases with disturbed bowel function and psychological complaints.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Medicine (miscellaneous)
Health Sciences > Nutrition and Dietetics
Language:German
Date:March 2019
Deposited On:09 Dec 2020 15:38
Last Modified:10 Dec 2020 21:00
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
ISSN:0007-1145
OA Status:Green
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114518003689
PubMed ID:30912735

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