Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Dolosigranulum pigrum cooperation and competition in human nasal microbiota


Brugger, Silvio D; Eslami, Sara M; Pettigrew, Melinda M; Escapa, Isabel F; Henke, Matthew T; Kong, Yong; Lemon, Katherine P (2020). Dolosigranulum pigrum cooperation and competition in human nasal microbiota. mSphere, 5(5):e00852-20.

Abstract

Multiple epidemiological studies identify Dolosigranulum pigrum as a candidate beneficial bacterium based on its positive association with health, including negative associations with nasal/nasopharyngeal colonization by the pathogenic species Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae Using a multipronged approach to gain new insights into D. pigrum function, we observed phenotypic interactions and predictions of genomic capacity that support the idea of a role for microbe-microbe interactions involving D. pigrum in shaping the composition of human nasal microbiota. We identified in vivo community-level and in vitro phenotypic cooperation by specific nasal Corynebacterium species. Also, D. pigrum inhibited S. aureus growth in vitro, whereas robust inhibition of S. pneumoniae required both D. pigrum and a nasal Corynebacterium together. D. pigrum l-lactic acid production was insufficient to account for these inhibitions. Genomic analysis of 11 strains revealed that D. pigrum has a small genome (average 1.86 Mb) and multiple predicted auxotrophies consistent with D. pigrum relying on its human host and on cocolonizing bacteria for key nutrients. Further, the accessory genome of D. pigrum harbored a diverse repertoire of biosynthetic gene clusters, some of which may have a role in microbe-microbe interactions. These new insights into D. pigrum's functions advance the field from compositional analysis to genomic and phenotypic experimentation on a potentially beneficial bacterial resident of the human upper respiratory tract and lay the foundation for future animal and clinical experiments.IMPORTANCEStaphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae infections cause significant morbidity and mortality in humans. For both, nasal colonization is a risk factor for infection. Studies of nasal microbiota identify Dolosigranulum pigrum as a benign bacterium present when adults are free of S. aureus or when children are free of S. pneumoniae Here, we validated these in vivo associations with functional assays. We found that D. pigrum inhibited S. aureusin vitro and, together with a specific nasal Corynebacterium species, also inhibited S. pneumoniae Furthermore, genomic analysis of D. pigrum indicated that it must obtain key nutrients from other nasal bacteria or from humans. These phenotypic interactions support the idea of a role for microbe-microbe interactions in shaping the composition of human nasal microbiota and implicate D. pigrum as a mutualist of humans. These findings support the feasibility of future development of microbe-targeted interventions to reshape nasal microbiota composition to exclude S. aureus and/or S. pneumoniae.

Abstract

Multiple epidemiological studies identify Dolosigranulum pigrum as a candidate beneficial bacterium based on its positive association with health, including negative associations with nasal/nasopharyngeal colonization by the pathogenic species Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae Using a multipronged approach to gain new insights into D. pigrum function, we observed phenotypic interactions and predictions of genomic capacity that support the idea of a role for microbe-microbe interactions involving D. pigrum in shaping the composition of human nasal microbiota. We identified in vivo community-level and in vitro phenotypic cooperation by specific nasal Corynebacterium species. Also, D. pigrum inhibited S. aureus growth in vitro, whereas robust inhibition of S. pneumoniae required both D. pigrum and a nasal Corynebacterium together. D. pigrum l-lactic acid production was insufficient to account for these inhibitions. Genomic analysis of 11 strains revealed that D. pigrum has a small genome (average 1.86 Mb) and multiple predicted auxotrophies consistent with D. pigrum relying on its human host and on cocolonizing bacteria for key nutrients. Further, the accessory genome of D. pigrum harbored a diverse repertoire of biosynthetic gene clusters, some of which may have a role in microbe-microbe interactions. These new insights into D. pigrum's functions advance the field from compositional analysis to genomic and phenotypic experimentation on a potentially beneficial bacterial resident of the human upper respiratory tract and lay the foundation for future animal and clinical experiments.IMPORTANCEStaphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae infections cause significant morbidity and mortality in humans. For both, nasal colonization is a risk factor for infection. Studies of nasal microbiota identify Dolosigranulum pigrum as a benign bacterium present when adults are free of S. aureus or when children are free of S. pneumoniae Here, we validated these in vivo associations with functional assays. We found that D. pigrum inhibited S. aureusin vitro and, together with a specific nasal Corynebacterium species, also inhibited S. pneumoniae Furthermore, genomic analysis of D. pigrum indicated that it must obtain key nutrients from other nasal bacteria or from humans. These phenotypic interactions support the idea of a role for microbe-microbe interactions in shaping the composition of human nasal microbiota and implicate D. pigrum as a mutualist of humans. These findings support the feasibility of future development of microbe-targeted interventions to reshape nasal microbiota composition to exclude S. aureus and/or S. pneumoniae.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics

Altmetrics

Downloads

4 downloads since deposited on 15 Dec 2020
4 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Microbiology
Life Sciences > Molecular Biology
Language:English
Date:9 September 2020
Deposited On:15 Dec 2020 18:58
Last Modified:01 Jan 2021 21:05
Publisher:American Society for Microbiology
ISSN:2379-5042
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1128/mSphere.00852-20
PubMed ID:32907957

Download

Gold Open Access

Download PDF  'Dolosigranulum pigrum cooperation and competition in human nasal microbiota'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)