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Resilience and stress in later life: a network analysis approach depicting complex interactions of resilience resources and stress-related risk factors in older adults


Thoma, Myriam V; Höltge, Jan; Eising, Carla M; Pfluger, Viviane; Rohner, Shauna L (2020). Resilience and stress in later life: a network analysis approach depicting complex interactions of resilience resources and stress-related risk factors in older adults. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 14:580969.

Abstract

Background: Emerging systemic approaches on resilience propose that a person's or group's adaptability to significant stress relies on a network of interdependent resources. However, little knowledge exists on systemic resilience in older survivors of early-life adversity (ELA) and how ELA affects their resource network in later life.
Objective: This study investigated how ELA may be linked to the interplay of resources and stress-related risk factors in later life.
Research Design and Methods: Data from N = 235 older adults (M age = 70.43 years; 46.40% female) were assessed. Half the participants were affected by ELA through compulsory social measures and placements in childhood, and/or adolescence ("risk group"). The other half were age-matched, non-affected participants ("control group"). Using psychometric instruments, a set of resilience-supporting resources in later life and current stress indices were assessed. Regularized partial correlation networks examined the interplay of resources in both groups, whilst also considering the impact of stress.
Results: Both groups demonstrated only positive resource interrelations. Although the control group showed more possible resource connections, the groups did not significantly differ in the overall strength of connections. While group-specific resource interrelations were identified, self-esteem was observed to be the most important resource for the network interconnectedness of both groups. The risk group network showed a higher vulnerability to current stress.
Discussion and Implications: Network analysis is a useful approach in the examination of the complex interrelationships between resilience resources and stress-related risk factors in older adulthood.

Abstract

Background: Emerging systemic approaches on resilience propose that a person's or group's adaptability to significant stress relies on a network of interdependent resources. However, little knowledge exists on systemic resilience in older survivors of early-life adversity (ELA) and how ELA affects their resource network in later life.
Objective: This study investigated how ELA may be linked to the interplay of resources and stress-related risk factors in later life.
Research Design and Methods: Data from N = 235 older adults (M age = 70.43 years; 46.40% female) were assessed. Half the participants were affected by ELA through compulsory social measures and placements in childhood, and/or adolescence ("risk group"). The other half were age-matched, non-affected participants ("control group"). Using psychometric instruments, a set of resilience-supporting resources in later life and current stress indices were assessed. Regularized partial correlation networks examined the interplay of resources in both groups, whilst also considering the impact of stress.
Results: Both groups demonstrated only positive resource interrelations. Although the control group showed more possible resource connections, the groups did not significantly differ in the overall strength of connections. While group-specific resource interrelations were identified, self-esteem was observed to be the most important resource for the network interconnectedness of both groups. The risk group network showed a higher vulnerability to current stress.
Discussion and Implications: Network analysis is a useful approach in the examination of the complex interrelationships between resilience resources and stress-related risk factors in older adulthood.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
Life Sciences > Cognitive Neuroscience
Life Sciences > Behavioral Neuroscience
Language:English
Date:2020
Deposited On:11 Jan 2021 16:31
Last Modified:24 Apr 2024 01:46
Publisher:Frontiers Research Foundation
ISSN:1662-5153
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3389/fnbeh.2020.580969
PubMed ID:33281572
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)