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Earlier versus later cognitive event-related potentials (ERPs) in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): A meta-analysis


Kaiser, Anna; Aggensteiner, Pascal-M; Baumeister, Sarah; Holz, Nathalie E; Banaschewski, Tobias; Brandeis, Daniel (2020). Earlier versus later cognitive event-related potentials (ERPs) in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): A meta-analysis. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 112:117-134.

Abstract

The current meta-analysis summarizes relevant literature on earlier (P100, N100, P200, N200, ERN/Ne) versus later (P300, Pe, CNV) cognitive Event-Related Potential (ERP) differences between children, adolescents, and adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and without ADHD (non-ADHD). Furthermore, the heterogeneity in previous research is addressed by analyzing potentially relevant demographic and methodological moderators (age group, IQ, medication, comorbidity, task, cognitive function, modality, inter-stimulus-interval, number of electrodes). Via database search 52 relevant articles were identified including n = 1576 ADHD and n = 1794 non-ADHD. Using multilevel-models, pooled effect sizes were calculated. For earlier components, individuals with ADHD showed shorter Go-P100-latencies than non-ADHD. For later ERPs, individuals with ADHD showed smaller Cue-P300-amplitudes, longer Go-P300-latencies, smaller NoGo-P300-amplitudes, longer NoGo-P300-latencies, smaller CNV-amplitudes, and smaller Pe-amplitudes. The substantial heterogeneity identified for most of the ERP components could be explained by the demographic and methodological moderators of interest. This meta-analysis identified relevant moderate group differences (-0.32<d<-0.57), mainly regarding later cognitive ERPs. Nevertheless, results are characterized by substantial heterogeneity and the moderate effect sizes (d<0.6) limit the use for clinical application.

Abstract

The current meta-analysis summarizes relevant literature on earlier (P100, N100, P200, N200, ERN/Ne) versus later (P300, Pe, CNV) cognitive Event-Related Potential (ERP) differences between children, adolescents, and adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and without ADHD (non-ADHD). Furthermore, the heterogeneity in previous research is addressed by analyzing potentially relevant demographic and methodological moderators (age group, IQ, medication, comorbidity, task, cognitive function, modality, inter-stimulus-interval, number of electrodes). Via database search 52 relevant articles were identified including n = 1576 ADHD and n = 1794 non-ADHD. Using multilevel-models, pooled effect sizes were calculated. For earlier components, individuals with ADHD showed shorter Go-P100-latencies than non-ADHD. For later ERPs, individuals with ADHD showed smaller Cue-P300-amplitudes, longer Go-P300-latencies, smaller NoGo-P300-amplitudes, longer NoGo-P300-latencies, smaller CNV-amplitudes, and smaller Pe-amplitudes. The substantial heterogeneity identified for most of the ERP components could be explained by the demographic and methodological moderators of interest. This meta-analysis identified relevant moderate group differences (-0.32<d<-0.57), mainly regarding later cognitive ERPs. Nevertheless, results are characterized by substantial heterogeneity and the moderate effect sizes (d<0.6) limit the use for clinical application.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
04 Faculty of Medicine > Neuroscience Center Zurich
04 Faculty of Medicine > Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
Life Sciences > Cognitive Neuroscience
Life Sciences > Behavioral Neuroscience
Language:English
Date:1 May 2020
Deposited On:16 Dec 2020 13:20
Last Modified:24 May 2024 01:44
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0149-7634
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2020.01.019
PubMed ID:31991190
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)