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Short-term effects of stain-causing beverages on tooth bleaching: A randomized controlled clinical trial


Chen, Ying-Hui; Yang, Song; Hong, Deng-Wei; Attin, Thomas; Yu, Hao (2020). Short-term effects of stain-causing beverages on tooth bleaching: A randomized controlled clinical trial. Journal of Dentistry, 95:103318.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To evaluate the short-term effects of stain-causing beverages on the effectiveness of in-office tooth bleaching.

METHODS

Participants were recruited and randomly divided into 3 groups based on beverages used for rinsing during and after the bleaching procedure: group N (tap water, control group), group C (coffee), and group T (tea). Participants were instructed to rinse with the respective solutions for 30 s, 4 times daily for 4 weeks. All participants received two in-office bleaching treatment sessions with 40 % hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence BOOST PF 40 %, Ultradent); the sessions were separated by a 1-week interval. Tooth colour was assessed using a spectrophotometer (Easyshade, Vita ZahnFabrik) before the bleaching procedure (T0), immediately after the first session of bleaching (T1), immediately after the second session of bleaching (T2), as well as one week (T3) and three weeks after (T4) the end of bleaching. Tooth sensitivity (TS) was ranked using a numerical rating scale (NRS) and a visual analogue scale (VAS) at different time points.

RESULTS

No significant difference in the whiteness index (W), △E, △a* and △b* values among the 3 groups was observed at any time interval (P for all > 0.05). At T4, the △L* value in group C was significantly lower than that in groups T and N (P = 0.022 and P = 0.001, respectively), though no significant difference in △L* values was observed among the 3 groups at T1 (P = 0.402), T2 (P = 0.643) and T3 (P = 0.177). Additionally, no significant difference was found in the TS values among the 3 groups at any of the evaluation time points (P for all > 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Exposure to coffee or tea during the bleaching treatment period did not affect the effectiveness of the treatment. However, exposure to coffee after the bleaching treatment did affect the effectiveness of the treatment. Exposure to stain-causing beverages did not affect the bleaching-induced TS (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03933527).

CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE

The consumption of coffee or tea during tooth bleaching may not interfere with the colour change produced by the treatment. However, clinicians should advise their patients to refrain from, at least to some extent, consuming coffee after the bleaching procedure to maintain the effectiveness of the treatment.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To evaluate the short-term effects of stain-causing beverages on the effectiveness of in-office tooth bleaching.

METHODS

Participants were recruited and randomly divided into 3 groups based on beverages used for rinsing during and after the bleaching procedure: group N (tap water, control group), group C (coffee), and group T (tea). Participants were instructed to rinse with the respective solutions for 30 s, 4 times daily for 4 weeks. All participants received two in-office bleaching treatment sessions with 40 % hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence BOOST PF 40 %, Ultradent); the sessions were separated by a 1-week interval. Tooth colour was assessed using a spectrophotometer (Easyshade, Vita ZahnFabrik) before the bleaching procedure (T0), immediately after the first session of bleaching (T1), immediately after the second session of bleaching (T2), as well as one week (T3) and three weeks after (T4) the end of bleaching. Tooth sensitivity (TS) was ranked using a numerical rating scale (NRS) and a visual analogue scale (VAS) at different time points.

RESULTS

No significant difference in the whiteness index (W), △E, △a* and △b* values among the 3 groups was observed at any time interval (P for all > 0.05). At T4, the △L* value in group C was significantly lower than that in groups T and N (P = 0.022 and P = 0.001, respectively), though no significant difference in △L* values was observed among the 3 groups at T1 (P = 0.402), T2 (P = 0.643) and T3 (P = 0.177). Additionally, no significant difference was found in the TS values among the 3 groups at any of the evaluation time points (P for all > 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Exposure to coffee or tea during the bleaching treatment period did not affect the effectiveness of the treatment. However, exposure to coffee after the bleaching treatment did affect the effectiveness of the treatment. Exposure to stain-causing beverages did not affect the bleaching-induced TS (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03933527).

CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE

The consumption of coffee or tea during tooth bleaching may not interfere with the colour change produced by the treatment. However, clinicians should advise their patients to refrain from, at least to some extent, consuming coffee after the bleaching procedure to maintain the effectiveness of the treatment.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic of Conservative and Preventive Dentistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > General Dentistry
Language:English
Date:April 2020
Deposited On:28 Dec 2020 12:43
Last Modified:24 Apr 2024 01:47
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0300-5712
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jdent.2020.103318
PubMed ID:32169479
  • Content: Accepted Version
  • Language: English