Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Kanda Sōtei: The Shogun’s Sacred Painters and their Realm of Influence


Steineck, Tomoë I M (2020). Kanda Sōtei: The Shogun’s Sacred Painters and their Realm of Influence. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies, 47(2):305-340.

Abstract

The sacrosanct painting atelier of Kan’eiji was headed throughout the Edo period by successive generations of the holder of the name Kanda Sōtei. Despite its special mandate, it has remained largely disregarded to this day, partly due to its alleged artistic conservatism and the limited number of recognized works. Given that the atelier was affiliated with Kan’eiji, the most powerful Tendai temple during the Edo period and one of the primary temples of the Tokugawa shogunate, a consideration of the religious, and most certainly political, implications behind its establishment is urgently needed. There is evidence that the scope of production and sphere of influence of the Kanda Sōtei lineage by far exceeded what has been previously assumed. Based on newly discovered materials, this article discusses the lineage’s conservatism and classicism in relation to the deification strategy of the Tokugawa shogunate, their consolidation of power based on the introduction of a new school of Shinto and the new deity Tōshō Daigongen, and its influence on the religious visual culture of the Edo period following the financial distress of the regime during the late seventeenth century.

Abstract

The sacrosanct painting atelier of Kan’eiji was headed throughout the Edo period by successive generations of the holder of the name Kanda Sōtei. Despite its special mandate, it has remained largely disregarded to this day, partly due to its alleged artistic conservatism and the limited number of recognized works. Given that the atelier was affiliated with Kan’eiji, the most powerful Tendai temple during the Edo period and one of the primary temples of the Tokugawa shogunate, a consideration of the religious, and most certainly political, implications behind its establishment is urgently needed. There is evidence that the scope of production and sphere of influence of the Kanda Sōtei lineage by far exceeded what has been previously assumed. Based on newly discovered materials, this article discusses the lineage’s conservatism and classicism in relation to the deification strategy of the Tokugawa shogunate, their consolidation of power based on the introduction of a new school of Shinto and the new deity Tōshō Daigongen, and its influence on the religious visual culture of the Edo period following the financial distress of the regime during the late seventeenth century.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

2 downloads since deposited on 11 Jan 2021
2 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Asian and Oriental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:290 Other religions
700 Arts
Uncontrolled Keywords:iconology, visual culture, cultural memory, deification, Tendai, painting
Language:English
Date:2020
Deposited On:11 Jan 2021 07:48
Last Modified:11 Jan 2021 08:05
Publisher:Nanzan Institute for Religion and Culture, Nagoya
ISSN:0304-1042
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.18874/jjrs.47.2.2020.305-340
Official URL:https://nirc.nanzan-u.ac.jp/nfile/4839

Download

Gold Open Access

Download PDF  'Kanda Sōtei: The Shogun’s Sacred Painters and their Realm of Influence'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 918kB
View at publisher