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Physiological responses to facemask application in newborns immediately after birth


Gaertner, Vincent D; Rüegger, Christoph Martin; O'Currain, Eoin; Kamlin, C Omar Farouk; Hooper, Stuart B; Davis, Peter G; Springer, Laila (2020). Physiological responses to facemask application in newborns immediately after birth. Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition:Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

Objective: Application of a face mask may induce apnoea and bradycardia, possibly via the trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR). We aimed to describe rates of apnoea and bradycardia in term and late-preterm infants following facemask application during neonatal stabilisation and compare the effects of first facemask application with subsequent applications.

Design: Subgroup analysis of a prospective, randomised trial comparing two face masks.

Setting: Single-centre study in the delivery room PATIENTS: Infants>34 weeks gestational age at birth METHODS: Resuscitations were video recorded. Airway flow and pressure were measured using a flow sensor. The effect of first and subsequent facemask applications on spontaneously breathing infants were noted. When available, flow waveforms as well as heart rate (HR) were assessed 20 s before and 30 s after each facemask application.

Results: In total, 128 facemask applications were evaluated. In eleven percent of facemask applications infants stopped breathing. The first application was associated with a higher rate of apnoea than subsequent applications (29% vs 8%, OR (95% CI)=4.76 (1.41-16.67), p=0.012). On aggregate, there was no change in median HR over time. In the interventions associated with apnoea, HR dropped by 38bpm [median (IQR) at time of facemask application: 134bpm (134-150) vs 96bpm (94-102) 20 s after application; p=0.25] and recovered within 30 s.

Conclusions: Facemask applications in term and late-preterm infants during neonatal stabilisation are associated with apnoea and this effect is more pronounced after the first compared with subsequent applications. Healthcare providers should be aware of the TCR and vigilant when applying a face mask to newborn infants.

Abstract

Objective: Application of a face mask may induce apnoea and bradycardia, possibly via the trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR). We aimed to describe rates of apnoea and bradycardia in term and late-preterm infants following facemask application during neonatal stabilisation and compare the effects of first facemask application with subsequent applications.

Design: Subgroup analysis of a prospective, randomised trial comparing two face masks.

Setting: Single-centre study in the delivery room PATIENTS: Infants>34 weeks gestational age at birth METHODS: Resuscitations were video recorded. Airway flow and pressure were measured using a flow sensor. The effect of first and subsequent facemask applications on spontaneously breathing infants were noted. When available, flow waveforms as well as heart rate (HR) were assessed 20 s before and 30 s after each facemask application.

Results: In total, 128 facemask applications were evaluated. In eleven percent of facemask applications infants stopped breathing. The first application was associated with a higher rate of apnoea than subsequent applications (29% vs 8%, OR (95% CI)=4.76 (1.41-16.67), p=0.012). On aggregate, there was no change in median HR over time. In the interventions associated with apnoea, HR dropped by 38bpm [median (IQR) at time of facemask application: 134bpm (134-150) vs 96bpm (94-102) 20 s after application; p=0.25] and recovered within 30 s.

Conclusions: Facemask applications in term and late-preterm infants during neonatal stabilisation are associated with apnoea and this effect is more pronounced after the first compared with subsequent applications. Healthcare providers should be aware of the TCR and vigilant when applying a face mask to newborn infants.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neonatology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Pediatrics, Perinatology and Child Health
Health Sciences > Obstetrics and Gynecology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health, General Medicine
Language:English
Date:9 December 2020
Deposited On:12 Jan 2021 16:32
Last Modified:13 Jan 2021 21:01
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:1359-2998
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1136/archdischild-2020-320198
PubMed ID:33298407

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