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Measurement of normal and pathological mandibular and temporomandibular joint kinematics: A systematic review


Woodford, Sarah C; Robinson, Dale L; Mehl, Albert; Lee, Peter V S; Ackland, David C (2020). Measurement of normal and pathological mandibular and temporomandibular joint kinematics: A systematic review. Journal of Biomechanics, 111:109994.

Abstract

Motion of the mandible and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) plays a pivotal role in the function of the dentition and associated hard and soft tissue structures, and facilitates mastication, oral communication and access to respiratory and digestive systems. Quantification of TMJ kinematics is clinically relevant in cases of prosthetic rehabilitations, TMJ disorders, osteoarthritis, trauma, tumour resection and congenital abnormalities, which are known to directly influence mandibular motion and loading. The objective of this systematic review was to critically investigate published literature on historic and contemporary measurement modalities used to quantify in vivo mandibular and TMJ kinematics in six degrees of freedom. The electronic databases of Scopus, Web of Science, Medline, Embase and Central were searched and 109 relevant articles identified. Publication quality was documented using a modified Downs and Black checklist. Axiography and ultrasonic tracking are commonly employed in the clinical setting due to their simplicity and capacity to rapidly acquire low-fidelity mandibular motion data. Magnetic and optoelectronic tracking have been used in combination with dental splints to produce higher accuracy measurements while minimising skin motion artefact, but at the expense of setup time and cost. Four-dimensional computed tomography provides direct 3D measurement of mandibular and TMJ motion while circumventing skin motion artefact entirely, but employs ionising radiation, is restricted to low sampling frequencies, and requires time-consuming image processing. Recent advances in magnetic tracking using miniature sensors adhered to the teeth in combination with intraoral scanning may facilitate rapid and high precision mandibular kinematics measurement in the clinical setting. The findings of this review will guide selection and application of mandibular and TMJ kinematic measurement for both clinical and research applications.

Abstract

Motion of the mandible and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) plays a pivotal role in the function of the dentition and associated hard and soft tissue structures, and facilitates mastication, oral communication and access to respiratory and digestive systems. Quantification of TMJ kinematics is clinically relevant in cases of prosthetic rehabilitations, TMJ disorders, osteoarthritis, trauma, tumour resection and congenital abnormalities, which are known to directly influence mandibular motion and loading. The objective of this systematic review was to critically investigate published literature on historic and contemporary measurement modalities used to quantify in vivo mandibular and TMJ kinematics in six degrees of freedom. The electronic databases of Scopus, Web of Science, Medline, Embase and Central were searched and 109 relevant articles identified. Publication quality was documented using a modified Downs and Black checklist. Axiography and ultrasonic tracking are commonly employed in the clinical setting due to their simplicity and capacity to rapidly acquire low-fidelity mandibular motion data. Magnetic and optoelectronic tracking have been used in combination with dental splints to produce higher accuracy measurements while minimising skin motion artefact, but at the expense of setup time and cost. Four-dimensional computed tomography provides direct 3D measurement of mandibular and TMJ motion while circumventing skin motion artefact entirely, but employs ionising radiation, is restricted to low sampling frequencies, and requires time-consuming image processing. Recent advances in magnetic tracking using miniature sensors adhered to the teeth in combination with intraoral scanning may facilitate rapid and high precision mandibular kinematics measurement in the clinical setting. The findings of this review will guide selection and application of mandibular and TMJ kinematic measurement for both clinical and research applications.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic of Conservative and Preventive Dentistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Biophysics
Health Sciences > Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
Physical Sciences > Biomedical Engineering
Health Sciences > Rehabilitation
Uncontrolled Keywords:Biophysics, Rehabilitation, Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, Biomedical Engineering
Language:English
Date:1 October 2020
Deposited On:15 Jan 2021 07:34
Last Modified:16 Jan 2021 21:02
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0021-9290
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2020.109994
PubMed ID:32971491

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Content: Accepted Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only until 9 October 2021
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Embargo till: 2021-10-09