Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

My brain needs a break: kindergarteners’ willpower theories are related to behavioral self-regulation


Compagnoni, Miriam; Sieber, Vanda; Job, Veronika (2020). My brain needs a break: kindergarteners’ willpower theories are related to behavioral self-regulation. Frontiers in Psychology, 11:online.

Abstract

Is the way that kindergarteners view their willpower – as a limited or as a non-limited resource – related to their motivation and behavioral self-regulation? This study is the first to examine the structure of beliefs about willpower in relation to behavioral self-regulation by interviewing 147 kindergarteners (52% girls) aged 5 to 7 years (M = 6.47, SD = 0.39). A new instrument was developed to assess implicit theories about willpower for this specific age group. Results indicated that kindergarteners who think of their willpower as a non-limited resource showed better behavioral self-regulation than children who adopted a more limited theory, even when controlling for age and gender. This relation was especially pronounced in low achieving children. Mediation and moderation analyses showed that this relation was partly mediated through the children’s willingness to invest effort to reach a learning goal. Findings suggest that fostering metacognitive beliefs in children, such as the belief that willpower is a non-limited resource, may increase behavioral self-regulation for successful adjustment to the demands of kindergarten and school.

Abstract

Is the way that kindergarteners view their willpower – as a limited or as a non-limited resource – related to their motivation and behavioral self-regulation? This study is the first to examine the structure of beliefs about willpower in relation to behavioral self-regulation by interviewing 147 kindergarteners (52% girls) aged 5 to 7 years (M = 6.47, SD = 0.39). A new instrument was developed to assess implicit theories about willpower for this specific age group. Results indicated that kindergarteners who think of their willpower as a non-limited resource showed better behavioral self-regulation than children who adopted a more limited theory, even when controlling for age and gender. This relation was especially pronounced in low achieving children. Mediation and moderation analyses showed that this relation was partly mediated through the children’s willingness to invest effort to reach a learning goal. Findings suggest that fostering metacognitive beliefs in children, such as the belief that willpower is a non-limited resource, may increase behavioral self-regulation for successful adjustment to the demands of kindergarten and school.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

6 downloads since deposited on 21 Jan 2021
6 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Education
Dewey Decimal Classification:370 Education
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > General Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Implicit theories about willpower, self-regulation, motivation, kindergarten, goal-orientation, self-control, willpower, meta-cognition
Language:English
Date:16 December 2020
Deposited On:21 Jan 2021 18:45
Last Modified:09 Feb 2021 13:37
Publisher:Frontiers Research Foundation
ISSN:1664-1078
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2020.601724

Download

Gold Open Access

Download PDF  'My brain needs a break: kindergarteners’ willpower theories are related to behavioral self-regulation'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 380kB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)