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Fluoro-deoxy-glucose uptake in the mylohyoid muscle: a common misconception


Pizzuto, Daniele A; Husmann, Lars; Stolzmann, Paul; Meerwein, Christian; Orita, Erika; von Schulthess, Gustav K; Huellner, Martin W (2020). Fluoro-deoxy-glucose uptake in the mylohyoid muscle: a common misconception. Nuclear medicine communications, 41(5):452-458.

Abstract

AIM

The mylohyoid muscle is often believed to exhibit high physiologic fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) uptake. Aim of this study was to use PET/MR for adequately assessing the normal FDG distribution in floor of the mouth (FOM) muscles and neighboring major salivary glands.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Patients scanned with a simultaneous PET/MRI system for initial staging or follow-up of head and neck tumors, with no malignant lesions in salivary glands or in FOM, were included. Volumes-of-interest (VOIs) were positioned separately for bilateral mylohyoid, digastric, genioglossus, and geniohyoid muscles, based on T2-weighted and T1-weighted images, and for bilateral parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glands in the same way. SUVmax was measured for each VOI.

RESULTS

Six hundred and ninety-two VOIs were positioned. FDG uptake in mylohyoid (SUVmax = 1.94 ± 0.37) and digastric muscles (SUVmax = 2.01 ± 0.37) were significantly higher compared to that in geniohyoid (SUVmax = 1.67 ± 0.53) and genioglossus muscles (SUVmax = 1.75 ± 0.54) (Friedman's test; P < 0.001). FDG uptake in the sublingual glands (SUVmax = 3.77 ± 1.63) was significantly higher compared to the parotid glands (SUVmax = 2.34 ± 0.60) and submandibular glands (SUVmax = 2.51 ± 0.59) (Wilcoxon signed-ranks test; P < 0.001). FDG uptake in sublingual glands was significantly higher than FDG uptake in the mylohyoid muscles (P < 0.001). FDG uptake in the parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glands was inversely correlated to the age of subjects (Spearman' rho coefficient: -0.397/P = 0.004; -0.329/P = 0.021; -0.535/P < 0.001, respectively).

CONCLUSION

The sublingual glands yield the highest physiologic FDG uptake in the FOM. High FDG uptake in the mylohyoid muscle is a common misconception.

Abstract

AIM

The mylohyoid muscle is often believed to exhibit high physiologic fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) uptake. Aim of this study was to use PET/MR for adequately assessing the normal FDG distribution in floor of the mouth (FOM) muscles and neighboring major salivary glands.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Patients scanned with a simultaneous PET/MRI system for initial staging or follow-up of head and neck tumors, with no malignant lesions in salivary glands or in FOM, were included. Volumes-of-interest (VOIs) were positioned separately for bilateral mylohyoid, digastric, genioglossus, and geniohyoid muscles, based on T2-weighted and T1-weighted images, and for bilateral parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glands in the same way. SUVmax was measured for each VOI.

RESULTS

Six hundred and ninety-two VOIs were positioned. FDG uptake in mylohyoid (SUVmax = 1.94 ± 0.37) and digastric muscles (SUVmax = 2.01 ± 0.37) were significantly higher compared to that in geniohyoid (SUVmax = 1.67 ± 0.53) and genioglossus muscles (SUVmax = 1.75 ± 0.54) (Friedman's test; P < 0.001). FDG uptake in the sublingual glands (SUVmax = 3.77 ± 1.63) was significantly higher compared to the parotid glands (SUVmax = 2.34 ± 0.60) and submandibular glands (SUVmax = 2.51 ± 0.59) (Wilcoxon signed-ranks test; P < 0.001). FDG uptake in sublingual glands was significantly higher than FDG uptake in the mylohyoid muscles (P < 0.001). FDG uptake in the parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glands was inversely correlated to the age of subjects (Spearman' rho coefficient: -0.397/P = 0.004; -0.329/P = 0.021; -0.535/P < 0.001, respectively).

CONCLUSION

The sublingual glands yield the highest physiologic FDG uptake in the FOM. High FDG uptake in the mylohyoid muscle is a common misconception.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Nuclear Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Imaging
Language:English
Date:May 2020
Deposited On:15 Jan 2021 09:14
Last Modified:05 Feb 2021 16:49
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0143-3636
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/MNM.0000000000001174
PubMed ID:32187162

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