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Introduction


Goeing, Anja-Silvia; Parry, Glyn; Feingold, Mordechai (2020). Introduction. In: Goeing, Anja-Silvia; Parry, Glyn; Feingold, Mordechai. Early Modern Universities: Networks of Higher Learning. Leiden: Brill, 1-14.

Abstract

Previous discussions of the early modern republic of letters by intellectual historians have tended to use a narrow definition of that republic that ex-cluded institutions of higher education. Informed by recent historiographical discussions that have broadened our interpretation of the “Republic of Let-ters,” this volume uses a framework which enables it to discuss wider devel-opments in the history of knowledge and science.1 Adapting a formulation used by the forthcoming Princeton University Press Information: A Historical Companion, we use “Republic of Letters” heuristically as a very broad cate-gory, “an international and self-described network of early modern scholars, philosophers, and thinkers who communicated with one another via letters and personal contact.”2 Our early modern Republic of Letters formed part of an intellectual world of connected scholarship, created by learned individu-als. Most of its male writers were products of their contemporary higher edu-cation system. While they were born into differing social strata, they shared a common approach to argument and writing, which followed classical models, and many of them wrote in Latin. We believe that their higher education was a necessary preparation which enabled them to develop new understandings and connections in the sciences. We therefore aim to integrate our discus-sion of higher education institutions into that broader republic of connected scholarship.

Abstract

Previous discussions of the early modern republic of letters by intellectual historians have tended to use a narrow definition of that republic that ex-cluded institutions of higher education. Informed by recent historiographical discussions that have broadened our interpretation of the “Republic of Let-ters,” this volume uses a framework which enables it to discuss wider devel-opments in the history of knowledge and science.1 Adapting a formulation used by the forthcoming Princeton University Press Information: A Historical Companion, we use “Republic of Letters” heuristically as a very broad cate-gory, “an international and self-described network of early modern scholars, philosophers, and thinkers who communicated with one another via letters and personal contact.”2 Our early modern Republic of Letters formed part of an intellectual world of connected scholarship, created by learned individu-als. Most of its male writers were products of their contemporary higher edu-cation system. While they were born into differing social strata, they shared a common approach to argument and writing, which followed classical models, and many of them wrote in Latin. We believe that their higher education was a necessary preparation which enabled them to develop new understandings and connections in the sciences. We therefore aim to integrate our discus-sion of higher education institutions into that broader republic of connected scholarship.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Education
Dewey Decimal Classification:370 Education
Uncontrolled Keywords:Universities; University; History of Higher Education; History of Universities; Academies; Colleges
Language:English
Date:7 December 2020
Deposited On:21 Jan 2021 19:40
Last Modified:25 Jan 2021 23:12
Publisher:Brill
Series Name:Scientific and Learned Cultures and Their Institutions
ISSN:2352-1325
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1163/9789004444058_002
Official URL:https://brill.com/view/book/edcoll/9789004444058/BP000001.xml

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